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Fracking Boom Gives U.S. Geopolitical Leverage

Steve Inskeep talks to Gregory Zuckerman, a senior writer with The Wall Street Journal, about how the fracking boom has given the U.S. power in pushing for an agreement with Iran on its nuclear weapons program. Zuckerman is the author of The Frackers: The Outrageous Inside Story of the New Billionaire Wildcatters.
NPR

Will Bitcoin Ever Rival U.S. Dollar?

Bitcoin is an online currency backed by nothing except faith that others will accept it. A young American couple wondered how far could they could push it. The Wall Street Journal reports the couple traveled to three continents, and managed to persuade merchants everywhere to accept the currency. Almost everywhere — they did go hungry for a night in Stockholm.
NPR

How The Sharing Economy Is Changing The Places We Work

The sharing economy is already changing several sectors: housing, transportation, retail. In some cities, it's changing the way we work. As more people start their own enterprises, they're shunning traditional offices and choosing to share space instead.
NPR

6 Ideas Being Floated To 'Fix' Obamacare Sign-Up Woes

As technical problems with the government's new health insurance marketplace slow the pace of sign-up, a variety of "fixes" have been proposed. But some of these would create their own challenges. In rough order from least to most disruptive, here are some of the ideas.
NPR

The Tech Stats We Now Know About HealthCare.gov

Government's top tech officials — including U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park — showed up on Capitol Hill to give a status report of the troubled HealthCare.gov system. As the administration unveils enrollment numbers, the tech officials outlined technology metrics of progress.
NPR

Americans Might Soon Get To Buy Mexican Beachfront, Border Land

Mexico is considering relaxing its law prohibiting foreigners from owning land within 30 miles of the coast or about 60 miles from an international border. Real estate developers say the change would lead to a boom along Mexico's coasts. But opponents fear it could launch a modern-day foreign land grab.
NPR

The Health Care Numbers Are Out, And They're Disappointing

Just over 100,000 people managed to get signed up for health insurance through the state and federal health exchanges, the Obama administration reported. But barely a quarter of those — 26,794 — signed up through the faltering HealthCare.gov website.
NPR

More Than 106,000 Chose Health Plans Under Affordable Care Act

Of those, less than 27,000 people used the federal HealthCare.gov site to select a plan, according to data from the Department of Health and Human Services. The government says 106,185 Americans picked out plans in the first month of enrollment.
NPR

Christmas Lights Make Slippers In Global 'Junkyard' Economy

The Chinese town of Shijiao is known for recycling discarded Christmas tree lights for their copper and wire insulation, which are then used to support growing economies and make slipper soles, respectively. In Junkyard Planet, Adam Minter explores the business of recycling what developed nations throw away.
NPR

ANALYSIS: Why Is '60 Minutes' So Tight-Lipped In Its Benghazi Apology?

TV's most storied newsmagazine still hasn't explained just how it made such big mistakes on a story about the terrorist attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, that it was later forced to retract. The reason for that might be found in a single word: Memogate.

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