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Recipe For A Great Burger? Fifteen Bucks An Hour

It's been 75 years since the U.S. instituted a federal minimum wage, but the debate is as hot as ever. Host Michel Martin speaks with Brian Parker, owner of a Detroit-area fast food restaurant, who's decided to pay his employees double the minimum wage. Also joining them is NPR's business editor Marilyn Geewax.
NPR

Are White Women Harder Hit By Poverty?

Many Americans are now living longer, but one group is being left behind. The average life expectancy for white women who dropped out of high school is shorter than it was two decades ago. Host Michel Martin finds out more from Monica Potts, a journalist at The American Prospect.
NPR

No Deal On Bangladesh Garment Factory Compensation Fund

At a meeting in Geneva, companies failed to set up a compensation fund for victims of the April disaster — the worst in the industry's history. Only one company announced compensation, and of the 20 invited for the meeting, nine turned up. One critic said the meeting lacked "clarity around objectives."
NPR

A Few Takes On How To Fix The Tech Industry's 'Bro' Problem

The tech industry's sometimes sexist "brogrammer" culture came into focus this week, when an offensive app was presented at an industry hackathon. So we asked developers, community leaders and others in the tech sphere to share their ideas for addressing the industry's cultural schism.
NPR

Dunkin Donuts Returns To Britain

The company on Thursday announced a deal for 50 new locations in London, with plans for more in the coming years. Dunkin did have shops in Britain but pulled out in the 1990s.
NPR

Sound Pioneer Ray Dolby Dies At 80

Dolby, who invented some of the technologies that revolutionized film and sound recording, was instrumental in developing surround sound technology. Dolby had been living with Alzheimer's and was diagnosed with leukemia this summer.
NPR

Twitter Files For Initial Public Offering

Twitter announced via Tweet Thursday that it's launching its long awaited initial public offering. It will be the most high profile IPO since Facebook went public last year. But Twitter hopes to avoid the mishaps that's marred Facebook's stock market debut.
NPR

5 Years After Financial Crisis, How's The Job Market Doing?

Sunday marks the 5th anniversary of the collapse of one of the nation's leading banking institutions Lehman Brothers. The failure of the bank triggered a global financial crisis and led to the deepest recession in decades. Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.
NPR

Without Action, Government Will Shut Down At Month's End

The four top congressional leaders held a closed-door meeting Thursday to assess where they stand on the coming government funding and debt-ceiling deadlines. As has become typical in recent years, some conservative House Republicans appear to be the stumbling block with their insistence that any deal repeal or defund Obamacare.
NPR

D.C. Mayor Vetoes Wage Bill Targetting Large Retailers

Wal-Mart says its plans to open six stores in the nation's capitol are back on after the mayor vetoed a so-called living wage bill that targeted big box retailers. The focus now turns to the District's 13 member City Council. The bill passed in July with eight votes — nine are needed to override a veto.

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