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NPR

For Jobs, Some Young Lawyers Are Keepin' It Rural

Recent law school grads are facing one of the worst job markets in decades. But there's one place where law firms are hiring — rural America, where some counties are served by just one or two attorneys. Now some law schools in Iowa and Nebraska are trying to encourage their students to reconsider practicing law in small towns.
NPR

In-Q-Tel: The CIA's Tax-Funded Player In Silicon Valley

For more than a decade, the CIA has run its own venture capital fund called In-Q-Tel, which has become one of the most unusual tech investors in Silicon Valley.
NPR

Yahoo Appoints Marissa Mayer, A Longtime Google Exec, As CEO

Mayer is the fifth CEO to take the helm at the ailing company in five years.
NPR

Billionaire Adelson Under Fire For Macau Dealings

Robert Siegel talks to Lowell Bergman about a ProPublica investigation into billionaire and Republican political contributor Sheldon Adelson. There are concerns that Adelson may have violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in his payments to a Macau lawyer who represented his firm's interests in the booming gambling capital. Bergman co-reported the story with Stephen Engelberg and Matt Isaacs for the Investigative Reporting Program of the University of California at Berkeley and PBS Frontline.
NPR

Call Me Maybe When Your School Loan Is Paid In Full

Beyond career choices and living arrangements, young adults say their student loan debt affects another key part of life: dating and marriage. Some have had partners break up over debt; other couples forge ahead, but keep finances separate and avoid legal marriage.
NPR

Coney: The Hot Dog That Fed Detroit's American Dream

Take a hot dog from New York's Coney Island, throw in plenty of Greek immigrants and a booming auto industry, add some chili sauce, a steamed bun, chopped onions, mustard and an epic sibling rivalry and you've got the makings of a classic American melting pot story.
NPR

Rethinking Free Tuition, College May Risk Reputation

After 110 years of free education, a college considers charging some students. Does it risk a backlash like one the Red Cross experienced during World War II?

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