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A Short History Of Government Shutdowns

Drawn-out fights over spending bills are nothing new for Congress. But before a 1980 ruling by President Carter's attorney general, the rest of the country barely noticed. That's because when lawmakers reached a budget stalemate back then, the federal workforce kept on working.
NPR

Chicago's Privatized Parking Meters Sour Airport Lease Deal

With the city's parking meter lease making voters leery of new privatization deals, Mayor Rahm Emanuel called for too many public interest protections in the Midway Airport lease, and too few investors saw it as worth the risk. Increasingly, though, governments turn to private investors to run public assets like roads and prisons.
NPR

Winning Baseball Divisions On Thrifty Budgets

In 2002, the Oakland A's made the playoffs with a fraction of the budget of other clubs. The economics of the team became the foundation for Moneyball, the book by Michael Lewis and the film starring Brad Pitt. That same team is in the playoffs again, with perhaps an even thriftier roster. Host Arun Rath speaks with sports writer Allen Barra.
NPR

JPMorgan In Talks To Avoid Criminal Charges

The financial giant is also facing civil charges and fines that could cost it $11 billion. JPMorgan is negotiating with the Justice Department over the company's handling of mortgage-backed securities leading up to the housing crisis. Host Scott Simon talks with New York Times columnist Joe Nocera about the significance of the talks.
NPR

Birch For Breakfast? Meet Maple Syrup's Long-Lost Cousins

Want to top your pancakes with something other than maple? The alternatives vary, depending on the types of trees in a region. There's Kahiltna birch syrup made in Alaska, blue spruce pine syrup from Utah and Georgian black walnut syrup.
NPR

Is The Fed Chair Succession Too Politicized?

Federal Reserve chairmen used to be named without much fanfare. Not this time. A very public competition between former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers and the current vice chairman of the Fed Janet Yellen has made headlines and pitted the White House against liberal Democrats in Congress. It raises the question of whether the Fed succession has become too politicized — and whether it could ultimately hurt the economy.
NPR

Nixed Flood Insurance Subsidy Drowns Coastal Home Values

In Florida, Louisiana, New York and other coastal states, many homeowners are in shock at new flood insurance rates that are rapidly approaching. After Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy left the National Flood Insurance Program $24 billion in the red, Congress revamped the program--phasing out subsidies. One group especially upset are new homeowners--people who bought a property and are now seeing their flood insurance costs skyrocket, making the property no longer affordable.
NPR

A Trip Down Government Shutdown Lane

Washington could be headed for another government shutdown. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks NPR's senior political editor Ron Elving whether there are any lessons to be learned from previous shutdowns.
NPR

Forget Shutdown, How About Kimmel & Kanye Showdown?

From the government shutdown to Kanye West and Jimmy Kimmel's showdown, the Barbershop guys weigh in on the week's hot topics.
NPR

Lessons About Insurance In The Obamacare Data Dump

Very few insurers around the country are offering top-of-the-line platinum insurance plans. Policymakers predicted less expensive but more restrictive bronze and silver plans would prove more popular than high-end options, and it looks like insurance companies think so, too.

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