Business | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Business

RSS Feed
NPR

Japanese TV Maker Sharp Doubles Expected Net Loss

Japanese TV maker Sharp on Thursday doubled its expected net loss for the year to more than $5 billion. The company also raised concerns about its ability to survive on its own. The news comes a day after another Japanese tech giant, Panasonic, forecast a nearly $10 billion loss for the year.
NPR

Help Wanted In Switzerland: Hunting Tax Cheats

Switzerland, which is almost synonymous with secretive banking, is looking for more staff to handle a flood of new requests from other countries that are looking for tax cheats. Last year the number of inquiries from overseas tax authorities almost doubled, to more than 700.
NPR

The Robots Haven't Taken Over The Stock Market (Yet)

The market shutdown is a reminder that if human beings can't travel to Wall Street — the actual street, not the metaphor — the financial system can't function.
NPR

Coal Mine Inspection Sweep Targets Cause Of Black Lung

One of the 13 coal mines singled out by inspectors was once owned by Massey Energy, the company that owned the Upper Big Branch mine, the scene of a deadly 2010 explosion. Two others are owned by Murray Energy, whose Crandall Canyon coal mine experienced two collapses in 2007, killing nine miners and rescuers.
NPR

Lucasfilm Deal Represents Shift In Hollywood

Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Zeitchik, who covers entertainment for the Los Angeles Times, about the recent Disney deal that bought out filmmaker George Lucas' production company Lucasfilm Ltd. for over $4 billion. The company is behind one of the most beloved, profitable and iconic movie franchises of all time, Star Wars.
NPR

Auto Legend Iacocca Backs Romney In Ohio Car Wars

As the presidential race zeroes in on Ohio, and the auto industry gets renewed focus in the all-important swing state, Mitt Romney's campaign touted the backing of former Chrysler CEO Lee Iacocca and the company's former president, Hal Sperlich.
NPR

America's Most Expensive Storms

Six of the 10 most expensive storms since 1900 have hit since 2000. But after you adjust for increases in population and wealth, the picture looks different.
NPR

Sandy's Economic Toll Stretches Far And Wide

Initial estimates forecast that damages and lost business from Sandy could top $30 billion. The state of the New York City subway system will be a critical factor. And many businesses are suffering because they are not insured for sustained business losses due to a weather catastrophe.

Pages