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The Mystery Of the Ridiculously Pricey Bag Of Potatoes

Did a 10-pound bag of potatoes really cost $15 back in 2008? We get to the bottom of some puzzling numbers in the lawsuit alleging America's potato growers have become a spud cartel.
NPR

European Aviation Firms Spotlighted At Paris Air Show

The world's premier commercial and military aviation and space trade fair is underway. The Paris Air Show is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The competition between European and U.S. plane makers Airbus and Boeing is a staple of the show.
NPR

Teen Prefers Jail To Home Detention

Authorities in New Zealand have been locking up some criminals in their homes rather than jail. A local newspaper reports one young man, after serving 10 months of his 11 month sentence, called the police to say he's "sick of playing Xbox games." And if they didn't pick him up, he would violate his detention.
NPR

Feds Raid 7-Eleven Stores In Immigration Scam

Authorities in New York have announced the arrest of eight men and one woman in what they say was a wide-ranging conspiracy to staff convenience stores with illegal immigrant workers and steal those workers' wages.
NPR

Obama Hints Fed Chairman May Be Leaving

President Obama has made the clearest hint yet that Ben Bernanke's time as chairman of the Federal Reserve may soon be up. In an interview that aired on PBS, Obama told Charlie Rose: "Ben Bernanke's a little bit like Bob Mueller, the head of the FBI, where he's already stayed a lot longer than he wanted or he was supposed to."
NPR

Why Buy A House When You Can Buy A Mountain?

Big names in business, entertainment and philanthropy pitched in to help buy a Utah ski mountain for a reported $40 million. They want to turn it into the next cool hub for culture and new ideas. "We look to build the coolest little mountain town in the world," says one of the buyers.
NPR

Dirty Spuds? Alleged Potato Cartel Accused Of Price Fixing

A civil lawsuit that shifted into U.S. district court in Idaho last week alleges that the United Potato Growers of America has become a veritable OPEC of spuds. The group is accused of using high-tech, strong-arm tactics to inflate potato prices.
NPR

High Court Sides With Regulators In Drug Patent Case

The Supreme Court sided with government regulators in an important case involving the pharmaceutical industry and patent law. At issue were contracts between "brand-name" pharmaceutical companies and "generic" producers in which the brand-name company paid the generic not to compete. The court said the Federal Trade Commission could challenge such contracts.
NPR

Google's 'Internet Balloons' Could Expand Online Access

Google's "Project Loon" just launched in New Zealand — it uses balloons floating in the stratosphere to bring high-speed Internet access to remote areas.
NPR

Wholesale Grocer Accuses Potato Farmers Of Price-Fixing

A wholesale grocer has brought a lawsuit against the United Potato Growers of America claiming they are running an illegal price-fixing cartel. According to the lawsuit the UPGA has gone so far as to employ aerial surveillance to ensure its members are abiding by agreements to reduce the potato supply. Robert Siegel speaks with Associated Press reporter John Miller in Boise, Idaho about the case.

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