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A Jolly Christmas? Retailers Count The Extra Days

Thanksgiving weekend spending shot up nearly 13 percent from last year, and there's more time between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year for people to shop. And if a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff comes just before Christmas, as some expect, it could brighten the economic mood of last-minute shoppers.
NPR

News Outlets Punk'd, Somebody Profits: Google Wi-Fi Buy Is A Hoax

A fake press release about a $400 million purchase sent one company's penny stock up sharply. News outlets that reported the story missed some telltale signs that it might be a hoax.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Explores Ways To Promote Small Business Growth

The Small Business Commission is exploring the idea that if Virginia focuses on awarding contracts to firms with fewer than 16 employees, it can result in more job growth for the commonwealth.

NPR

SEC Chief Schapiro Is Leaving; New Chairman Chosen

Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Mary Schapiro will step down on Dec. 14. President Obama has designated SEC Commissioner Elisse Walter to be her successor.
NPR

How Much Would '12 Days Of Christmas' Cost This Year?

Each year PNC Wealth Management adds up all 364 items in the carol — the swans, the geese, the golden rings — and comes up with a price tag. This year they'd cost more than $107,000, up more than 6 percent from last year.
NPR

'Cyber Monday,' 'Giving Tuesday;' Then 'Weeping Wednesday?'

There are clever names for many of the holiday season's key shopping days. Today's is in honor of what's said to be the biggest online shopping day. Tuesday's aims to get people to be charitable. Maybe Wednesday's should be for when the bills come in?
NPR

Is Charging Customers For Returns Bad Business?

It's an old saying in retail: "The customer is always right." But many companies that sell online or through catalogs have moved away from that motto — making customers pay to return merchandise. Sellers think it's a fair policy. Consumers don't see it that way, and a new study suggests that firms would be far better off in the long run footing the bill for returns.

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