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'Office' Fans Can Now Buy Dunder Mifflin Copy Paper

The long running NBC comedy series The Office is about a group of workers employed by fictitious paper company Dunder Mifflin. The Wall Street Journal reports that an office supply website called Quill.com has struck a licensing agreement with NBC to sell copy paper using the fictitious brand name.
NPR

Demand For Denver Apartments Outstrips Supply

The housing crisis has stalled home building but apartment construction is undergoing a bit of a renaissance. There's now a huge pool of people forced to rent because they can't afford to buy a home, or they were a victim of foreclosure. In Denver, there aren't enough apartment vacancies.
NPR

Egyptian Stocks Open Higher On Election News

Peaceful voting in Egypt has given the country's stock market a boost. Cairo's market was closed on Monday when the landmark elections started. When trading opened Tuesday, the benchmark stock index surged more than 5 percent.
NPR

Is Income Inequality A Problem In The U.S.?

According to the latest Census figures, the wealthiest Americans saw huge jumps in their income, while the rest had their incomes go down. For a deeper understanding of the wealth gap, Steve Inskeep talks to Tyler Cowen, an economist at George Mason University, and Matthew Yglesias, who writes about economics for the website Slate.com.
NPR

Judge Rejects Citigroup, SEC Settlement

A federal judge has nixed a $285 million settlement between Citigroup and the Securities and Exchange Commission. He said the deal was "neither fair, nor adequate nor in the public interest." The settlement dealt with Citigroup's handling of subprime mortgage debt prior to the financial crisis.
NPR

Following Digital Breadcrumbs To 'Big Data' Gold

In the past couple of years, computing, storage and bandwidth capacity have become so cheap that it's altered the scale of what's possible in terms of collecting and analyzing data at every turn. It's a tectonic shift that will continue to affect many things we do for decades to come, one expert says.
NPR

Judge Scraps Citigroup Deal

A federal judge nixed a $285 million settlement agreement between Citigroup and the Securities and Exchange Commission involving a major financial case. U.S. District Court Judge Jed Rakoff said the proposed agreement is "neither far, no reasonable, nor adequate, nor in the public interest." Under the deal, Citi would have settled charges that it misled investors in mortgage debt prior to the collapse of the housing market. Rakoff has been a persistent critic of the SEC's oversight of Wall Street. Guy Raz talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli for more.

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