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Beatles Anti-Segregation Contract Sells For $23,000

A signed contract for a Beatles performance in the 1960s was up for bid at an auction. It stipulates the Beatles will not play in front of a segregated audience. The documents for the San Francisco concert were only expected to fetch about $5,000. An undisclosed bidder paid $23,000.
NPR

'Moneyball' Is About More Than Just Baseball Stats

The movie Moneyball opens Friday. Based on the Michael Lewis book, it focuses on the rise of advanced statistical analysis in Major League Baseball.
NPR

Google Chief Defends Company's Search Practices

Google critics accuse the company of playing favorites with its search results. Google executives have always denied this, but the accusations haven't gone away. Eric Schmidt, the company's chairman, was on Capitol Hill Wednesday to answer questions about the company's business practices.
NPR

Infrastructure Funds Benefit More Than The Economy

A number of U.S. mayors have been in Washington this week for meetings at the White House and on Capitol Hill. Their message: We need help. Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett was in the group from the U.S. Conference of Mayors. And he was the sole Republican. Cornett talks to David Greene about the needs of cities amid the debate over federal budget cuts.
NPR

UAW Talks With Chrysler Stall, Turn Focus To Ford

Contract talks between the United Auto Workers and Chrysler have stalled. So the union is turning its focus to Ford. Meanwhile, workers at General Motors will start voting on their agreement that was reached last week.
NPR

IMF Lowers Britain's Economic Growth Assessment

The British government has rejected calls for an easing of its austerity policy in favor of a new fiscal stimulus for the economy. The IMF cut its growth forecasts for Britain on Wednesday — warning that the country was in danger of slipping into recession.
NPR

Egypt's Political Turmoil Drives Foreign Tourists Away

Revolution and tourism don't mix. Just ask the Egyptians. The tourism industry is crucial for Egypt's economic well-being, but foreigners have been staying away since the upheaval in February that ousted President Hosni Mubarak.

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