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Post Office To Move Forward With Cuts

The U.S. Postal Service is expected to announce Monday that it's moving forward with cuts that it says will save billions of dollars and help avoid bankruptcy.
NPR

Can't Get It Out Of Your Head: Hanson's MMMhop Beer

The 1997 song "MMMbop" catapulted the youthful trio of brothers known as Hanson to fame. The pop group has faded in popularity, though the Hansons are still making music. More importantly, they're all old enough to drink now. So next year, instead of releasing a new album, Zac, Taylor and Isaac Hanson are releasing a new beer: an India pale ale called MMMhop.
NPR

Italy's Prime Minister $40 Billion 'Save Italy' Plan

Italy's Prime Minister Mario Monti on Monday must persuade lawmakers to pass a giant reform package aimed at reducing debt and balancing the country's budget. The $40 billion package includes hikes in taxes, cuts in pensions, an increase in the retirement age, and measures to reduce tax evasion.
NPR

Merkel, Sarkozy Meet Ahead Of Brussels Summit

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Nicolas Sarkozy now agree that European treaties will have to be altered to give institutions the firepower to deal with the euro crisis, but many differences remain — and time is running out.
NPR

Why Burn Doctors Hate Instant Soup

Instant cups of soup — the kind that often come in a styrofoam cup full of noodles — send children to the hospital every day.
NPR

Why Buy Toys When You Can Rent?

If you've shopped at a toy store recently, you know that you can easily spend hundreds of dollars on just a few items. So why not just rent the toys instead? Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rachel Martin tells us how toy rental websites work.
NPR

Milwaukee's 'Misery Index': Infant Mortality

As the city lost industrial jobs, its infant mortality rate skyrocketed. In one particular ZIP code, one baby dies for every 59 that make it. That's a rate that's worse than in parts of rural China.
NPR

How Europe's Troubles Could Become Ours, Too

If Greece, Spain, Italy or other European governments were to suddenly default on their debts, European banks could find themselves holding worthless assets and becoming insolvent. That could lead to a global financial meltdown worse than the one in 2008.

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