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Electronics Arts Named Worst Company In America

According to The Consumerist, the video game publisher received more than 250,000 reader votes for that distinction. It was singled out for deliberately holding back video game content so it can charge for it later, and for buying up small video game companies to squash competition.
NPR

Budget Proposals Have Different Government Vision

Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about how the Republican budget by Wisconsin Representative Paul Ryan compares with President Obama's proposal. The plans show differences on spending, taxes and dealing with the government.
NPR

Average U.S. Car Price Tops $30,000

Average prices for cars are at an all-time high, reflecting increased demand and a healthier economy. The average car price has gone up nearly $2,000 since last year. Even though car prices are higher, buyers haven't shied away from picking up a new car.
NPR

The Most (And Least) Lucrative Committees In Congress

See which committees do the most (and which do the least) to help lawmakers raise money for re-election.
NPR

Intel Legends Moore And Grove: Making It Last

In Silicon Valley, the spotlight is often on young entrepreneurs with fresh ideas that will change the world. But for decades, two titans of the tech world thrived in the fast-paced industry: legendary Intel executives Gordon Moore and Andy Grove.
NPR

Murdoch's Unrivaled Hold On The Australian Press

Between 6 and 7 of every 10 copies of national and metro papers sold in Australia are owned by News Ltd., News Corp.'s Australian newspaper arm. There is pride in the global success of a local boy, but cynicism, too.
NPR

Phone Tracking Big Business For Cell Companies

Earlier this week the American Civil Liberties Union revealed information it obtained from a FOIA request to local police departments across the country about how police track and tap cell phones, often without warrants. Also contained in the release is information that cell carriers make money by charging law enforcement for that information. Robert Siegel speaks with Andy Greenberg of Forbes who has looked into fees.

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