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NPR

Don't Take His Stapler: 'Paper Clip' Author's Passion For Office Supplies

James Ward's new book stems from a lifelong love of Post-it notes, pencils and paper clips. He tells NPR's Melissa Block that they remind him of his school days, when life was less complicated.
NPR

'Pope And Mussolini' Tells The 'Secret History' Of Fascism And The Church

Historian David Kertzer says the Catholic Church lent organizational strength and moral legitimacy to Mussolini's fascist regime. Kertzer recently won a Pulitzer Prize for his book.
NPR

Rejected Decades Ago, Publisher Can't Keep 'Pioneer Girl' In Stock

In the 1930s, unknown author Laura Ingalls Wilder couldn't find a publisher for her memoir, Pioneer Girl. Instead, she and her daughter turned the stories into a series of Little House books.
NPR

Book Review: 'The Language Of Paradise'

NPR's Alan Cheuse reviews The Language of Paradise by Barbara Klein Moss.
WAMU 88.5

The 'Delta Collection': Sneaking A Peek At The Library Of Congress' Erotica Stash

The Library of Congress holds a vast collection of reference materials and books — including plenty of erotica and pornography.

NPR

Lunch With Monet, Dinner With Jackson Pollock

Two new books focus on the culinary lives of these two artists. Turns out, their approaches to food provide a new way of thinking about their two very different approaches to art.
NPR

Bradley's 'China Mirage' Portrays A Long-Running U.S. Mistake In Asia

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to author and historian James Bradley, about his his new book, The China Mirage: The Hidden History of the American Disaster in Asia.
NPR

After 20 Years On The Job, NYC Police Officer Tells His Intense Stories

"Your heart is pounding; your adrenaline is shooting out of your ears," Steve Osborne says. "And you got one second to get it right." He retired from the force in 2003. His memoir is called The Job.
NPR

Revisiting A Suburbia-Gone-Sour In Ross Macdonald's Crime Fiction

A reissue of four of the detective writer's 1950s novels excavates the dark depths of California's suburban decay. Maureen Corrigan praises Macdonald's "psychological depth" and "penetrating vision."
NPR

No Demons, No Angels: Attica Locke Aims For Black Characters Who Are Human

In her new novel, Pleasantville, and on TV's Empire, Locke does her best to avoid simple stories. "You do some good stuff and you do some bad stuff," she says. "We exist in the middle."

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