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NPR

Barney Rosset: A Crusader Against Censorship Laws

The book publisher who championed the works of beat poets and Samuel Beckett, and who defied censors with the publication of Lady Chatterley's Lover and Tropic of Cancer, died Tuesday at age 89. Fresh Air remembers Rosset with excerpts from a 1991 interview.
NPR

What Science Fiction Books Does A Futurist Read?

Science fiction's job is to give us a map of where we're headed. From Jules Verne to William Gibson, sci-fi authors describe their visions of the future, and how people might live in it. We ask Intel's futurist for his list of favorite sci-fi books.
NPR

When Empires Fail: 3 Books That Predict The Crash

Have you ever had the feeling that you've overstepped your boundaries? Author Tim Wu has — or, at least, he's read about it. He recommends three books on the disastrous consequences it can have. Tell us about a time you should have known your limits in the comments section.
NPR

What Happened In 'Watergate': An Alternate Take

Thomas Mallon's new novelization of the infamous political scandal re-imagines the events through the eyes of the perpetrators. Critic Heller McAlpin says Mallon manages to capture both the metastasizing dishonesty and the ludicrousness of this great American tragedy of political ambition run amok.
NPR

Publishing Pioneer Barney Rosset Dies At 89

Barney Rosset gave American readers their first taste of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, as well as uncensored classics by Henry Miller and D.H. Lawrence. To do that, Rosset fought literally hundreds of court cases and was largely responsible for breaking down U.S. obscenity laws in the 1950s and '60s.
NPR

How Companies Are 'Defining Your Worth' Online

Advertisers collect information with every digital move people make. They then target ads based on that information. Communications scholar Joseph Turow worries that advertisers will use such data to discriminate against people and put them into "reputation silos."
NPR

'Panther Baby,' From Prisoner To Professor

Jamal Joseph was a 15-year-old honor student when joining the Black Panther Party. He later faced a 12-year sentence in Leavenworth Penitentiary for helping fugitive Panther members. Behind bars, he taught a theater group, and now he teaches the arts at Columbia University. His new book is part of Tell Me More's Black History Month memoir series. Advisory: This conversation may not be comfortable for some listeners.

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