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'The Life That Follows' Disarming IEDs In Iraq

Brian Castner commanded two Explosive Ordnance Disposal units in Iraq, where his team disabled roadside IEDs and investigated the aftermath of roadside car bombings. He returned home a completely different man, which he details in his memoir, The Long Walk.
WAMU 88.5

"Snow-Storm in August:" D.C.'s First Race Riot

In 1835, a drunken slave entered his mistress' bedroom with an axe, setting in motion events that would lead to Washington's first race riot. We learn about the fascinating, and nearly forgotten, characters involved in the incident and its aftermath.

NPR

Dark Doings Among The D.C. Monuments

NPR's Linda Wertheimer walks the halls of power — and the local cafes — with crime novelist Mike Lawson, whose Joe DeMarco books serve up murder and mayhem in the nation's capital.
NPR

'Electrified Sheep' And Other Odd Experiments

In his new book Electrified Sheep, Alex Boese explores a colorful side of science, filled with bizarre experiments and eccentric scientists, like the surgeon who decided to operate on himself, and Benjamin Franklin, who gave mouth-to-beak resuscitation to a bird.
NPR

What's Travel Writer Paul Theroux Reading?

We're asking people this summer what's on their nightstand. Author Paul Theroux, probably best known for his travel writing, gives us his summer reading pick: Rough Stone Rolling, by Richard Lyman Bushman.
NPR

How The Olympic 'Dream Team' Came To Be

Twenty years ago, a dozen basketball players were dispatched to Barcelona to represent the United States in the Olympics. The team was something the world of sports had never seen before, and probably never will again. Guest host David Greene talks with Jack McCallum about his new book on the players, Dream Team.
NPR

Jennifer Weiner: 'Best Thing' Would Be Equality

Author Jennifer Weiner's new novel draws on her experience creating and running a television show. Weiner writes bitingly about the experiences of women in Hollywood writers' rooms — and she's also very vocal about the disrespect female authors face from literary critics.
NPR

'Agent Garbo,' The Spy Who Lied About D-Day

Juan Pujol Garcia lived a lie that helped win World War II. Nicknamed for the enigmatic actress Greta Garbo, Garcia's own performance was so convincing he fooled Hitler himself.
NPR

Abraham Lincoln 'Impeached.' Wait, What?

Did Abraham Lincoln subvert the Constitution? That's the startling premise of a new novel from Yale Law School professor Stephen Carter, in which Lincoln survives that terrible night at Ford's Theatre, only to face an impeachment trial two years later.
NPR

'After Murder': Learning To Live After You've Killed

Can a murderer ever be redeemed? That's the question journalist Nancy Mullane takes on in her new book, Life After Murder. Over the past few years, Mullane has made dozens of trips to California's San Quentin prison to interview men locked up for committing heinous crimes.

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