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'Prague Fatale': 'Downton Abbey With SS'

Author Philip Kerr's latest novel takes his wartime German gumshoe Bernie Gunther from Berlin to Prague at the behest of notorious SS boss Reynhard Heydrich. Gunther must solve an Agatha Christie-style country house murder mystery in which the suspects are all mass murderers already.
NPR

Permanent Siesta: 3 Books To Whisk You Away

You don't usually travel to distant places with heavy books. And besides, you're traveling, not reading, right? But author Adam Wilson suggests three books that you should take with you — regardless of their weight. Do you have a favorite book to read while you travel? Let us know in the comments.
NPR

Searching For Nature's Time Machines in 'Relics'

In a new book, Relics: Travels in Nature's Time Machine, Harvard entomologist and photographer Piotr Naskrecki documents his travels, from New Guinea to New Zealand and beyond, looking for organisms whose genes can tell us something about conditions on Earth millions of years ago.
NPR

Poet Marie Howe Reflects On The 'Living' After Loss

"Poetry holds the knowledge that we are alive and that we know we're going to die," poet Marie Howe tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. One of Howe's most famous poems, "What the Living Do," was recently included in The Penguin Anthology of 20th-Century American Poetry.
NPR

Hellbent For Living: A Screwball Parisian Adventure

There are many books set in the so-called City of Light, but author Rosecrans Baldwin says that none are quite as charming as The Dud Avocado. Have a favorite tale set in France? Let us know what it is in the comments.
NPR

Snark And Sass: 3 Books On The True Nature Of Paris

Many people think of Paris as a city of sophistication and beauty. But author Amy Thomas knows that living there isn't always fun. She recommends three books that show how frustrating, judgmental, and maddening Paris can be. Have you ever lived abroad? Tell us about your experience in the comments.
NPR

The DOJ E-Book Lawsuit: Is It 1934 All Over Again?

The Department of Justice's lawsuit against Apple and five major publishers for e-book price fixing sent shivers through the industry — but Jason Boog says this fraught relationship between American publishers, retailers and the DOJ goes back to the Great Depression.

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