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Beloved Children's Author Maurice Sendak Dies

Maurice Sendak, the well-known children's book author and illustrator, has died. He was 83. Sendak is widely known for his book Where the Wild Things Are. Steve Inskeep has this remembrance.
NPR

Fresh Air Remembers Author Maurice Sendak

Author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, whose classic children's book Where the Wild Things Are became a perennial and award-winning favorite for generations of children, died Tuesday. He was 83. Fresh Air remembers Sendak with excerpts from several interviews.

NPR

Review: 'The Hunger Angel'

Poet and novelist Herta Muller won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2009 — the year her German-language novel was first published. Now it's been published in English as The Hunger Angel.
NPR

My Little Brother, The President

Auma Obama, President Obama's half-sister, discusses their relationship, and what his rise has meant to the Obama family in Kenya. Host Michel Martin speaks with Auma Obama about her recently released memoir, And Then Life Happens.
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'Drift': Rachel Maddow On Why We Go To War

In her new book, MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow invokes Thomas Jefferson to argue for limited government — at least in the case of the military. She argues that sometimes we got to war because we've invested so much in military strength.
NPR

'Birdseye': The Frozen Food Revolution

Before locavores and the "slow food" movement, one man's invention radically transformed how (and what) we eat. In his new book, Mark Kurlansky shows us the curious, roving mind that made TV dinners possible.
NPR

'Bring Up The Bodies': Taking Down Anne Boleyn

Hilary Mantel is the Booker Prize-winning author of Wolf Hall. The next installment of her trilogy about the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell is titled Bring Up the Bodies. It tells the story of Cromwell's part in the massive coup that took down Henry VIII's second wife, Anne Boleyn. Host Scott Simon speaks with the author.
WAMU 88.5

Stuart Firestein: "Ignorance: How It Drives Science"

A neuroscientist claims that ignorance--not knowledge--is the true engine of science. He explains how scientists use ignorance to concentrate their research, and why "not knowing" is one of the greatest benefits to science.

NPR

The U.S. Ambassador Inside Hitler's Berlin

William Dodd served for four years as the ambassador to Germany before resigning — after repeated clashes with both Nazi Party officials and the State Department. Erik Larson chronicles Dodd's time in Berlin in his new book, In the Garden of Beasts.

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