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'Present': For Nadine Gordimer, Politics Hit Home

Nadine Gordimer has always incorporated political themes into her novels, but her latest work turns its sights toward the domestic sphere. In No Time Like the Present, a South African activist couple struggles to find happiness in a world of their own making.
NPR

For Carole King, Songwriting Is A 'Natural' Talent

Carole King wrote songs for others before becoming a performer and writing for herself. In her new memoir, A Natural Woman, she details the stories behind some of her most famous songs and her relationships with songwriters like James Taylor, Gerry Goffin and Paul Simon.
NPR

Justice Dept. Accuses Apple And Others Of Fixing E-Book Prices

The Justice Department's concerns stem from the way e-books have been priced since Apple introduced the iPad. Apple and other companies have denied any wrongdoing and say they have improved competition.
NPR

'Winding Up' As The Mets' Knuckleball Pitcher

New York Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey is currently the only knuckleball pitcher in the major leagues. His new memoir, Wherever I Wind Up, explains how his life — and career — have mimicked the unpredictable trajectory of the difficult pitch he throws game after game.
NPR

Carole King, From Doo-Wopper To Chart Topper

Singer-songwriter Carole King started young: She was just 15 when she founded a doo-wop group with her classmates. The act never took off, but King eventually became one of the biggest-selling artists of all time. She tells the story of her career so far in a new memoir, A Natural Woman.
NPR

Best Books (And Surprising Insights) On Lincoln

Politicians love to invoke Honest Abe, often while twisting his legacy to fit their own purposes. But who was the man, really? Three Lincoln historians discuss the books they think best capture the president's character.
NPR

Review: 'These Dreams Of You'

Although it starts out as a seemingly conventional novel, These Dreams of You by Steve Erickson gradually becomes experimental fiction as the plot turns on a series of improbable coincidences. Alan Cheuse, who teaches writing at George Mason University, has a review.

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