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Three-Minute Fiction

Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction is open. Author Luis Alberto Urrea, the new judge, is on board and ready to read. The challenge this round: The story must begin with the sentence, "She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally decided to walk through the door." As always, the story must be 600 words or fewer. To submit a story, go to npr.org/threeminutefiction.
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'Schoolhouse': Rosenwald Schools In The South

Sears, Roebuck President Julius Rosenwald and civil rights leader Booker T. Washington got together to help build of thousands of schoolhouses for black children in the segregated South. Author Stephanie Deutsch tells the story of their friendship in You Need a Schoolhouse.
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Artful, American Essays From 'When I Was A Child'

Novelist Marilynne Robinson takes on Christian faith and the American West in her new collection of essays, When I Was a Child I Read Books. "I find that the hardest work in the world," she writes, "... is to persuade Easterners that growing up in the West is not intellectually crippling."
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Three-Minute Fiction Round 8: She Closed The Book...

Weekends on All Things Considered is launching Round 8 of its Three-Minute Fiction contest. This time, the story has to start with this sentence: "She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally, decided to walk through the door."
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'1861': A Social History Of The Civil War

Historian Adam Goodheart explains how national leaders and ordinary citizens across the country responded to the chaos and uncertainty in 1861: The Civil War Awakening.
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'Lifespan': What Are The Limits Of Literary License?

When an intern accused author John D'Agata of embellishing the facts in an essay, the two began wrestling over the writer's responsibility to the truth, and even the meaning of truth itself. The Lifespan of a Fact is the real-life record of their debate (or is it?).
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'Fragile Beginnings': When Babies Are Born Too Soon

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy's son Patrick was born prematurely and died of a respiratory problem that is now routinely treated. In the 50 years since, extraordinary advancements have been made in the field of neonatal intensive care. Dr. Adam Wolfberg explores those triumphs in his new book.
NPR

'Little Free Libraries' Hope For Lending Revolution

Two Wisconsin men are on a mission to break Andrew Carnegie's record of creating over 2,500 libraries. They're enlisting the help of book lovers and artists in neighborhoods across the country to help reach that goal, one "Little Free Library" at a time.

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