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Book News: Chuck Palahniuk Working On 'Fight Club' Sequel

Also: James Lasdun on turning down Doris Lessing; Stephen Hawking's new memoir; why Barnes & Noble isn't dead yet.
NPR

The Gronkowskis On Raising A Family Of Champions

A lot dads dream of seeing their kids make it as pro athletes. But only Gordy Gronkowski can say he has three sons in the NFL, and a fourth who was a professional baseball player. Gordy and his sons talk about their new memoir Growing Up Gronk: A Family's Story of Raising Champions.
NPR

Book News: Scrapbooks Of Hemingway's Childhood Made Public

Also: Sony wins lawsuit brought by owners of Faulkner's works; Kevin Maher on James Joyce's Dubliners.
NPR

In Nairobi, A Maasai Detective Pursues Elusive Justice

Richard Crompton wrote his first novel, a crime thriller, to explore the value of justice in the developing world. Hour of the Red God stars Detective Mollel, who is charged with investigating a homicide in a city many still know as "Nairobbery."
NPR

Living With Tragedy And Fright In A 'Beautiful Place'

Writer Howard Norman's memoir focuses on particular people and moments. His stories contain disturbing incidents, from the murder-suicide of a mother and her young son in his home, to the accidental death of a swan in the Arctic. He also tells of a strange, frightening and humorous Inuit shaman.
NPR

Flying High And Low In 'Full Upright And Locked Position'

In a new book, aviation consultant Mark Gerchick writes that "the magic of air travel has morphed into an uncomfortable, crowded and utterly soulless ordeal." He talks about how it's gotten so bad, why there are so many hidden fees and if there actually is less leg room than there used to be.
NPR

'No Regrets': A Murder Mystery, Tangled In Life's Troubles

John Dufresne's new novel is a funny, dark murder mystery set in South Florida. No Regrets, Coyote begins with the murder of a family and an amateur sleuth intent on solving the crime.
NPR

Professor Helps Reveal J.K. Rowling

Crime novelist Robert Galbraith was outed as British author J.K. Rowling of the Harry Potter books fame. Reporters were tipped off to Galbraith's true identity by an anonymous tweet, and they turned to an unlikely source to confirm Rowling's authorship: a computer science professor at Pittsburgh's Duquesne University.
NPR

From Ramen To Rotini: Following The Noodles Of The Silk Road

Is it possible that pasta originated in China and traveled west to Italy? Author Jen Lin-Liu travels the historic Silk Road from Beijing to Rome tracing the evolution of pasta and sampling the offerings along the way.
WAMU 88.5

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: "Americanah"

"Americanah" is a novel that unfolds across three continents, raising questions about identity everywhere it goes. We talk with author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie about her latest work, her popular TED talks and her place in the world of literature.

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