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How The Glock Became America's Weapon Of Choice

In his book Glock: The Rise of America's Gun, Paul Barrett traces how the sleek, high-capacity Austrian weapon found its way into Hollywood films and rap lyrics, not to mention two-thirds of all U.S. police departments.
NPR

How Dr. Seuss Got His Start 'On Mulberry Street'

Theodor Geisel's first book for kids was rejected 27 times before it was finally published in 1937. And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was inspired by a very ordinary street in Geisel's Massachusetts hometown.
NPR

Niche No More: Survey Shows Tablets Are Everywhere

A new survey indicates that 29 percent of American adults now own a tablet computer and/or an e-reader. That number went up 11 percent in just a few weeks, a sure sign that the gadgets were given as holiday gifts and have reached the point of mass acceptance.
NPR

A Ball (And A Caldecott) For 'Daisy' The Dog

A Ball for Daisy is a story of loss — a little dog loses her favorite red ball to a much larger dog — but now it's also a story about winning: On Monday, Chris Raschka's book won the American Library Association's Randolph Caldecott Medal for best illustrated story.
NPR

The Inquisition: A Model For Modern Interrogators

The Inquisition revolutionized record-keeping and surveillance techniques that are still used today, says Cullen Murphy. His new book God's Jury draws parallels between some of the interrogation techniques used in previous centuries with the ones used today.
NPR

India's Literary Festival Opens Amid Controversy

Tens of thousands of people are attending the Jaipur Literature Festival in India — including many international literary stars and Oprah Winfrey. Author Salman Rushdie was invited but decided not to attend after a warning that hit men would be after him. Rushdie wrote The Satanic Verses which has been banned in India for more than 20 years.
NPR

Publishers And Booksellers See A 'Predatory' Amazon

Just before Christmas, Amazon infuriated booksellers with an app that allowed customers to check out prices in brick-and-mortar stores and then get a discount if they bought from Amazon instead. Now publishers and booksellers are looking for new ways to compete with the Goliath of online retailers.

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