Books | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Books

RSS Feed
NPR

Nuns Top '50 Shades' In Classical Music Smackdown

Fifty Shades of Grey: The Classical Album has been on Billboard's Classical Traditional Albums chart for 11 weeks, most recently in the top slot. But the album has been bumped this week by The Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles — a group of singing nuns from Missouri. The Benedictines' album is called, Advent at Ephesus. Melissa Block and Robert Siegel have more.
NPR

An Existential Guide For When You're Really 'Lost'

Astrophysicist Adam Frank doesn't usually read self-help books, but something about Walter Percy's existential optimism in Lost In The Cosmos actually changed his outlook on life. Do you have a favorite self-help book? Tell us in the comments below.
NPR

'Times' Advice Guru Answers Your Social Q's

New York Times advice columnist Philip Galanes details how to handle breakups, cellphone calls and food allergies — among other topics — in his book Social Q's: How to Survive the Quirks, Quandaries and Quagmires of Today.
WAMU 88.5

"Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder"

"The Black Swan" author Nassim Nicholas Taleb discusses his latest work "Antifragile" and how we can thrive in a world controlled by randomness.

WAMU 88.5

Bookend: D.C. Romance Novelists Defy Stereotypes

In the latest edition of our monthly literary series, Bookend, we talk with local romance writers about the increasing popularity of their genre.

NPR

Is The World 'Getting Somalia Wrong?'

Somalia hasn't had a functioning central government for more than 20 years. But journalist Mary Harper says its image as a failed state is misleading. She argues that, even without a central government, businesses and local politics have found a way to flourish. Host Michel Martin talks with Mary Harper about her new book, Getting Somalia Wrong?
NPR

Book Review: 'Zoo Time'

Alan Cheuse reviews Booker Prize winner Howard Jacobsen's latest book, Zoo Time.
NPR

Librarian Nancy Pearl's Picks For The Omnivorous Reader

The only thing that these books have in common is that NPR's go-to librarian likes them a lot. Nancy Pearl's self-described "higgledy-piggledy" list includes a book of cartoons, a Civil War history, a coming-of-age story, a spy novel and more.

Pages