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Book News: The Smell Of Chocolate Boosts Book Sales, Study Says

Also: John Hodgman on Ayn Rand; J.K. Rowling to donate proceeds of new novel to charity; Fox News defends anchor's interview with the author of Zealot.
NPR

Bodies On The Boardwalk: Murder Stirs A Sleepy Jersey Shore

When he was a kid, writer Chris Grabenstein loved tourist towns, so he set novels in one of his favorites — the Jersey shore. He says one of the great joys of writing is coming up with an interesting place to drop the body, like a roller coaster or a tilt-a-whirl.
NPR

How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy

At the start of the 20th century, the ruthless, self-made steel industrialist paid $60 million for 1,689 public libraries to be built in communities around the U.S. "The man who dies rich dies in disgrace," Carnegie wrote.
NPR

Book Review: 'The Darwin Elevator'

Alan Cheuse could not put down a new sci-fi thriller by former gamer Jason Hough. Cheuse reviews the book, The Darwin Elevator.
NPR

Texas Author John Graves Dies At 92; Wrote 'Goodbye To A River'

His books became icons of rural life in Texas. Graves' 1960 memoir, Goodbye to a River, recounts a canoe trip along a doomed waterway he knew in his youth. The book "was quickly recognized as a classic," NPR member station KERA reports.
NPR

Book News: Booksellers Irate Over Obama's Amazon Visit

Also: an excerpt from George R.R. Martin's upcoming novella; a plea from the OED; a new short story from Adam Johnson.
NPR

On The Road To Rock Excess: Why The '60s Really Ended In 1973

In the new book What You Want Is in the Limo, author Michael Walker argues that a peak year in the careers of Led Zeppelin, Alice Cooper and The Who also marked a cultural shift — from the peace, love and understanding of 1960-era music to '70s rock decadence.
NPR

Pioneering 'Masters Of Sex' Brought Science To The Bedroom

William Masters and Virginia Johnson became famous in the 1960s for their research into the physiology of human sexuality. In Masters of Sex, biographer Thomas Maier explores the duo's research methods, which for years remained shrouded in secrecy.
NPR

Book News: Campaigner For Jane Austen Banknote Deluged With Threats

Also: Gary Shteyngart tests out Google Glass; Fifty Shades of Grey and the rise in handcuff accidents.
NPR

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Journalist Alison Stewart chronicles the history of Dunbar High School in her new book, First Class. She says the Washington, D.C., school — which has graduated Army generals, Cabinet members and musicians — can serve as a model for urban schools today.

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