Books

RSS Feed
NPR

Greenspan: 'I Probably Could Have Caught' Economic Crises

Alan Greenspan was often celebrated during his long chairmanship of the Federal Reserve. But Greenspan's policies have been blamed by some for the Great Recession. In an interview with NPR about his new book, The Map and the Territory: Risk, Human Nature, and the Future of Forecasting, Greenspan discusses difficulties in predicting economic calamity.
NPR

'A Time To' Revisit Clanton, Miss., In John Grisham's Latest

John Grisham is returning to the world of his first novel, A Time To Kill, with a new sequel called Sycamore Row. The book comes out at the same time as the stage adaptation of A Time to Kill opens on Broadway. NPR's Lynn Neary profiles Grisham, who says he loved writing the new book so much, he didn't want to hand it to the publisher.
NPR

Anne Rice's New Werewolf Novel Paws Familiar Territory

Alan Chese reviews The Wolves of Midwinter, the latest in Anne Rice's The Wolf Gift Chronicles.
NPR

Billy Crystal Finds Fun In Growing Old (But Still Can't Find His Keys)

Crystal isn't happy about turning 65, but at least he's finding a way to laugh about it. The actor and comedian's new memoir — Still Foolin' 'Em: Where I've Been, Where I'm Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys? — is on the best-seller list and he'll be back on Broadway in November.
NPR

Jack London Believed 'Function Of Man Is To Live, Not To Exist'

A new biography of the writer behind Call of the Wild and White Fang explores the life experiences that informed those works. London grew up in poverty, says biographer Earle Labor. "He was a dreamer, and a visionary. And his dreams and visions almost always outran his finances."
NPR

Gilbert Puts A Novel Spin On Love And 'All Things' Botanical

The memoir Eat, Pray, Love turned author Elizabeth Gilbert into a phenomenon. Now, she turns again to fiction with The Signature of All Things, a novel that reviewer Lizzie Skurnick calls "one of the best of the year."
NPR

Meet 'The Brothers' Who Shaped U.S. Policy, Inside And Out

In 1953, President Dwight Eisenhower appointed John Foster Dulles as secretary of state, and Allen Dulles as director of the CIA. In his new book, The Brothers, journalist Stephen Kinzer says the Dulles' actions "helped set off some of the world's most profound long-term crises."
NPR

After Sept. 11, Special Ops Were 'Injected With Steroids'

Two recent operations in Libya and Somalia offer a vivid example of how members of U.S. Special Operations are being deployed around the world to go after terrorists. Renee Montagne talks to author Jeremy Scahill about his newest book, Dirty Wars, which is about the rise of special forces.
NPR

'Quiet Dell' Revives A Depression-Era Murder Story

In 1931, Harry Powers killed two women and three children at his home in Quiet Dell, W.Va. Writer Jayne Anne Phillips learned about the murders from her mother, who was a child when the deaths became a media sensation. Phillips' new novel retells the tragedy through the eyes of a young reporter.
NPR

'Double Life' Depicts A Norman Mailer In, Yet Not Of, The World

Alan Cheuse reviews the new biography Norman Mailer: A Double Life by J. Michael Lennon. The book is 900 pages long and comes from an admiring biographer with incredible access to Mailer, who died six years ago.

Pages