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Remembering Children's Book Author Maurice Sendak

Artist, illustrator, and writer Maurice Sendak died Tuesday at the age of 83. Sendak illustrated more than 80 books — 20 of which he wrote himself. He's best remembered for his children's classic Where The Wild Things Are. Host Michel Martin looks at the life and legacy of Maurice Sendak.
NPR

Can Mo' Money Really Mean Mo' Problems?

Many people believe money can solve all their problems. But Richard Watts, a financial and legal advisor to the very rich, says there's some truth to the saying, "more money, more problems." Watts speaks with host Michel Martin about his new book, Fables of Fortune: What Rich People Have That You Don't Want.
WAMU 88.5

From "Running with Scissors" to Self-Help

Memoirist Augusten Burroughs is moving into another, perhaps unexpected, realm: self-help. He simultaneously takes down and contribute to the $11 billion industry with his latest book "This is How" - the book he says he was born to write.

NPR

Beloved Children's Author Maurice Sendak Dies

Maurice Sendak, the well-known children's book author and illustrator, has died. He was 83. Sendak is widely known for his book Where the Wild Things Are. Steve Inskeep has this remembrance.
NPR

Fresh Air Remembers Author Maurice Sendak

Author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, whose classic children's book Where the Wild Things Are became a perennial and award-winning favorite for generations of children, died Tuesday. He was 83. Fresh Air remembers Sendak with excerpts from several interviews.

NPR

Review: 'The Hunger Angel'

Poet and novelist Herta Muller won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2009 — the year her German-language novel was first published. Now it's been published in English as The Hunger Angel.
NPR

My Little Brother, The President

Auma Obama, President Obama's half-sister, discusses their relationship, and what his rise has meant to the Obama family in Kenya. Host Michel Martin speaks with Auma Obama about her recently released memoir, And Then Life Happens.
NPR

'Drift': Rachel Maddow On Why We Go To War

In her new book, MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow invokes Thomas Jefferson to argue for limited government — at least in the case of the military. She argues that sometimes we got to war because we've invested so much in military strength.

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