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A Judge's Cookbook Reveals The Secrets Of Bialys And Bagels

Michael Zusman used to be a lawyer, specializing in suing financial companies. The work literally started making him sick. Then he stumbled into baking. His new cookbook promises that you can make your own pastrami, pickles and bagels better than you can buy at your local deli.
NPR

Booking A Flight For The 'Golden Age Of Hijacking'

In the 1960s, catching a flight wasn't much of a hassle. No lines, no security screenings and no need to show ID. But the ease of travel brought with it some serious consequences.
NPR

Labor Department Picks Books That Shaped American Jobs

For the Department of Labor's centennial celebration, Carl Fillichio thought outside the box and asked the public for books that influenced work in America. The usual suspects are there — Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and What Color is Your Parachute — but also some oddball choices from children's literature and poetry. Fillichio gives NPR's Jennifer Ludden highlights from the ongoing project.
NPR

'Havisham' Offers A Peek Behind That Decaying Wedding Veil

Miss Havisham is one of Charles Dickens' most enduring characters. She appears in Great Expectations as an eccentric recluse, jilted at the altar years ago, who still wears her wedding gown and presides over a rotting feast. In his new novel, Ronald Frame imagines the kind of life that would have created such a woman.
NPR

As Winter Rolls In, One Critic Recalls 'The Wind In The Willows'

This week's Must Read, our topical book recommendation series, usually focuses on events in the news. But today, with an eye on the dropping thermometer, book critic Parul Sehgal suggests a seasonal text. Kenneth Grahame's classic children's novel offers a cozy, eccentric depiction of winter — perfect for curling up with as the snow comes down.
NPR

Nancy Pearl Turns Back The Pages With Picks From The Past

NPR's go-to librarian returns to some old favorites from her personal shelves. "All the books on my bookshelves are books that I loved," she says. "Those are the only books I keep." Her picks include a trilogy of novellas filled with British humor and an Irish mystery.
NPR

Poetry Uncovers Legacy Of Medgar Evers 50 Years Later

The assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers has been chronicled in films and books. Now the voices of his widow --and his killer-- are reimagined in a collection of poetry. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Frank X Walker about his book, "Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers."
NPR

Shavit's 'My Promised Land Examines Israel's Complexities

Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep talks to Israeli journalist Ari Shavit about his new book My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel. Shavit attempts to capture the complexity and contradictions of modern Israel by examining his country's history.
NPR

Written In Secret Behind The Iron Curtain, 'Corpse' Is Revived

An amazing book has surfaced from behind the Soviet-era Iron Curtain says our reviewer, Alan Cheuse. The book is Autobiography of a Corpse by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky.
NPR

Writing 'Rudolph': The Original Red-Nosed Manuscript

Everybody knows Rudolph was the last reindeer to join Santa's crew, but few people know about the department store employee who brought his story to the world. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer was written by Robert L. May, a copywriter for Montgomery Ward, who, like his protagonist, had always felt like a bit of an outcast.

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