Books

RSS Feed
NPR

Like Individual Novels, These Stories Appeal, Satisfy And Delight

Molly Antopol's short stories are set in many different times and places. But reviewer Meg Wolitzer says each one will make you nostalgic for another era in short fiction, a time when writer like Bernard Malamud, and Issac Bashevis Singer and Grace Paley roamed the earth.
NPR

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction' Are Humans The Asteroid?

The dinosaurs were killed during the Fifth Extinction — which scientists suspect was caused by an asteroid. Now, we are living through an epoch that many scientists describe as the Sixth Extinction and this time, human activity is the culprit.
NPR

The Earth's Sixth Extinction May Be One Of Our Own Making

Over the last half a billion years, there have been five major mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on Earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. But this time around, writer Elizabeth Kolbert says, humans are causing the extinction.
NPR

Practicing 'Extreme Medicine,' From Deep Sea To Outer Space

In his new book, Dr. Kevin Fong explores how humans survive extremes of heat, cold, outer space and deep sea. "We're still exploring the human body and what medicine can do in the same way that the great explorers of the 20th century and every age before them explored the world," he says.
NPR

Fighting Gender Bias: 'Women Need To Be Savvier Than Men'

Host Michel Martin talks to Rachel Dempsey and Joan Williams, co-authors of What Works For Women At Work about why gender bias is still a major problem, and how to fight it in the workplace.
NPR

'Dancing Fish,' 'Ammonites' And A Literary Life Well-Lived

For 44 years, British author Penelope Lively has been publishing children's books, short stories and novels. Her latest book, Dancing Fish and Ammonites, is subtitled "A Memoir," but critic Ellah Allfrey says it is "more a collection of thoughts, a scattering of advice and a reading list to treasure."
NPR

Sounds Intriguing: The World's Most Interesting Noises

As an acoustic engineer, Trevor Cox has spent most of his career getting rid of bizarre, unwanted sounds. But in The Sound Book, Cox turns up the volume on those sonic oddities. The book explores weird echoes and unexpected noises from around the globe — including "whisper galleries" and a chirping pyramid.
NPR

Wherefore Art Thou Robo-Shakespeare? Or Better Yet, How?

Nathan Matias is not a poet — at least, not in the conventional sense of the word. Rather, he's a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who has written a Shakespearean sonnet using a computer program. Matias' program used predictive language, limited only to word choices made by William Shakespeare, to produce an entirely new poem in the voice of the Bard. He joins us to talk about his process and beautiful product.
NPR

Review: 'An Officer And A Spy'

Alan Cheuse reviews An Officer and a Spy, a novel by Richard Harris that revives the Dreyfus Affair.
WAMU 88.5

The Enduring Popularity Of Sherlock Holmes

A popular BBC series and a lawsuit over whether his stories are in the public domain are drawing attention once again to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of one of literature's most iconic characters: Sherlock Holmes. We consider the enduring appeal of the "canon" of four novels and 56 short stories featuring Holmes and Watson, and the many interpretations they've inspired on page and screen.

Pages