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Michael Sandel: "What Money Can't Buy"

Harvard professor Michael Sandel on whether there's something wrong with a world in which everything is for sale.

WAMU 88.5

Bookend: Pulitzer Prize Winner Edward P. Jones Discusses His Work

For this month's Bookend, we bring you the most decorated fiction writer D.C. has produced in recent years: Pulitzer Prize winner Edward P. Jones.

NPR

Thousands Line Up For Rare Rowling Appearance

Long lines snaked around New York City Tuesday as J.K. Rowling made her only U.S. appearance promoting her new book for adults, The Casual Vacancy. NPR's Margot Adler reports that while the crowds were large, they were overjoyed to meet the woman who created Harry Potter.
NPR

'Gershwins And Me' Tells The Stories Behind 12 Songs

Musician Michael Feinstein chronicles his experience working as an archivist and cataloger for legendary songwriter Ira Gershwin. The book is presented through the stories of 12 of the Gershwin brothers' songs, including "Fascinating Rhythm," "The Man I Love" and "I Got Rhythm."
WAMU 88.5

Henry Kellerman: "Personality: How It Forms"

A psychologist explains why the way we learn to manage anger as a child is so critical to our personalities as adults.

NPR

Hilary Mantel First Woman To Win Booker Prize Twice

Writer Hilary Mantel has won her second Man Booker prize. She was recognized for her book, Bring Up The Bodies. Mantel is the first British writer and woman to win the award more than once.
NPR

In A 'Dream,' Lincoln Checks In On State Of The Union

In Abe Lincoln's Dream, the 16th president wants to know how the nation is doing since the Civil War. Caldecott award-winning author and illustrator Lane Smith says he was inspired by stories of Lincoln's real dreams. "He had premonitions," Smith says. "He was haunted by his dreams."
NPR

Technology Helps Track A Terrorist In 'The Finish'

Black Hawk Down author Mark Bowden's new book outlines the changes in warfare since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and the way our increasing computational power has helped capture terrorists like Osama bin Laden.

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