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Virgin's Richard Branson Bares His Business 'Secrets'

Branson dropped out of school at 15, but by 16 he had his own magazine, and by 21 he had opened his first business — Virgin Records. Today, he's the head of a global business empire. In Like a Virgin, Branson shares the story of his success.
NPR

'Mr. Penumbra' Bridges The Digital Divide

Author Robin Sloan has written short stories and worked for Twitter. His new book brings those two worlds together to argue that embracing digital culture doesn't mean you have to give up the treasured books — and values — of the past.
NPR

Everything You Wanted To Know About 'Indians'

Columbus Day always carries some controversy. In these politically correct times, people who want to learn more about Native Americans, and their side of the story, might be afraid to ask. Host Michel Martin sorts through some of those tough questions with Anton Treuer, who wrote Everything You Wanted To Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask.
NPR

Wyclef Says Karma Kicked His 'Caesar Complex'

Wyclef Jean has been in the limelight for nearly two decades. He's a multi-platinum musician, producer, and politician in his native Haiti. Now, he's out with a new memoir, Purpose: An Immigrant's Story. He sits down with host Michel Martin to talk his book, his childhood in Haiti, and how music helped him adjust to life in the U.S.
NPR

The Wild Adventure Continues in 'Under Wildwood'

Colin Meloy, best known as the Decemberists' front man, is also a novelist. His newest book is the second in a series for young readers, called Wildwood Chronicles. The book catches up with its precocious protagonist, Prue, who leaves the seventh grade to return to the magical world of Wildwood.
NPR

Catching The 'Shadow' Of A Lost World

Photographer Edward Curtis decided to chronicle the experience of the vanishing Native American tribes at the end of the 19th century. It was an unbelievably ambitious project that would define Curtis, his work and his legacy.
NPR

'Wooden Floors' Pack Hidden Thrill In Author's Debut

When an aspiring writer agrees to look after his old friend's flat, enduring an absent homeowner's passive-aggressive notes isn't the worst that will happen. In his first novel, Care of Wooden Floors, Will Wiles follows a housesitting job gone terribly, terribly wrong.
NPR

Fallen 'Lion': How The 'House Of Assad' Came Down

When Bashar Assad inherited the presidency of Syria in 2000, some in the West saw him as a potential reformer. Professor David Lesch of Trinity University met Assad several times. Host Scott Simon speaks with Lesch about his new book, Syria: The Fall of the House of Assad, a clear contrast to his earlier book, which touted Assad as "the new lion of Damascus."
NPR

A Love Song To Family, New York In 'Sunlight'

Mark Helprin's sweeping midcentury novel, In Sunlight and In Shadow, describes a postwar New York in limbo. Helprin borrowed from his own experiences to write this tale of love and familial obligations. "It's all based on what I know and what I knew," he says.
WAMU 88.5

The Man Behind "A People's History:" Howard Zinn

We talk with historian Martin Duberman about his new biography of Howard Zinn, which paints an intimate portrait of a complex and private man.

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