Books | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Books

RSS Feed
NPR

Valerie Eliot Helped Shape A Writing Legend's Legacy

Valerie Eliot, author T.S. Eliot's second wife, has died at the age of 86. Host Scott Simon remembers Valerie Eliot, who became the guardian of the Eliot legacy. She published an acclaimed edition of The Waste Land, complete with notes from Ezra Pound, and became a generous patron of poetry.
NPR

'The Lawgiver': Telling Moses' Story, Differently

At the age of 97, bestselling author Herman Wouk has written a novel that's told by the most contemporary storytelling technology, including emails and transcripts of Skype conversations. Host Scott Simon talks with Wouk about The Lawgiver.
NPR

What Makes A City 'Walkable' And Why It Matters

City planner Jeff Speck says walking will remain a choice in most American cities for years to come, but that it's important to incentivize pedestrians. In his book, Walkable City, Speck says urban walks have to be useful, safe, comfortable and interesting.
NPR

Finding 'Life, Death And Hope' In A Mumbai Slum

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Katherine Boo spent more than three years in Mumbai's Annawadi slum. In her book Behind the Beautiful Forevers, she profiles people living in extreme poverty — right in the shadow of luxury hotels. On Wednesday, the book won the National Book Award for nonfiction.
NPR

'When God Talks Back' To The Evangelical Community

Anthropologist T.M. Luhrmann studies the personal relationships evangelicals develop with God. In her book When God Talks Back, she explains how relationships with God are often cemented through the power of prayer. The book has just come out in paperback.
WAMU 88.5

"Reading Rainbow" Returns: LeVar Burton (Rebroadcast)

Actor LeVar Burton on the roles that have defined his career and the relaunch of "Reading Rainbow."

WAMU 88.5

Author Lois Lowry (Rebroadcast)

Kojo talks with award-winning children's and young adult author Lois Lowry.

WAMU 88.5

"Snow-Storm in August:" D.C.'s First Race Riot (Rebroadcast)

In 1835, a drunken slave entered his mistress' bedroom with an axe, setting in motion events that would lead to Washington's first race riot. We learn about the fascinating, and nearly forgotten, characters involved in the incident and its aftermath.

NPR

Book Review: 'Writers Writing Dying'

Poet Tess Taylor reviews a collection of poems by C.K. Williams called Writers Writing Dying. She says it's a jaunty and surprisingly cheerful collection of poems about being mortal and loving poetry; cheerfully accessible, slightly morbid. Williams is a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner.

Pages