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NPR

Libraries And E-Lending: The 'Wild West' Of Digital Licensing?

About three-quarters of public libraries offer e-books, according to the American Library Association. But finding the book you want to read can be a challenge when every publisher has its own licensing rules for libraries — and several major houses don't sell e-books to libraries at all.
NPR

Margaret Atwood's Brave New World Of Online Publishing

Charles Dickens wrote many of his greatest works in serial form, but serial publishing has fallen by the wayside since his day. Now, it's being revived online, and Margaret Atwood is publishing a future-dystopia novel called Positron in installments via the literary website Byliner.
NPR

Change Is The Only Constant In Today's Publishing Industry

The publishing industry has been in flux for years. First chain stores, then Amazon, then e-books — all combined to create dramatic change. Industry consultant Mike Shatzkin outlines some of the biggest changes, like the recently announced merger of Penguin and Random House.
NPR

R.A. Dickey On 'Winding Up' As A Knuckleballer

New York Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey is currently the only knuckleball pitcher in the major leagues. His memoir, Wherever I Wind Up, explains how his life — and career — have mimicked the unpredictable trajectory of the difficult pitch he throws game after game.
NPR

'Law & Order' Meets Tom Clancy In Dick Wolf's First Novel

The Law & Order creator's detective fiction debut is set in New York after the killing of Osama bin Laden. Although The Intercept borrows stylistically from Wolf's television background, he says novel writing allows him "to tell bigger stories on a bigger canvas."
NPR

Joan Rivers Hates You, Herself and Everyone Else

Comedian Joan Rivers hates a lot of things. Her new book, I Hate Everyone, Starting With Me, details the things Rivers can't stand, from her appearance to obituaries to younger comedians who steal her gigs.
NPR

No Sugar Plums Here: The Dark, Romantic Roots Of 'The Nutcracker'

Few people today remember E.T.A. Hoffmann, but most everyone is familiar with his most famous creation: The Nutcracker. NPR's Robert Siegel traces the history of everyone's favorite Christmas ballet all the way back to its much darker original version.
WAMU 88.5

JMU Professor Writes About Herbert Huncke's Life And The Beat Generation

Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs are all names you might recognize as poets of the Beat Generation. But a scholar in Virginia has published a book tracing the life of a friend and inspiration to all three of them.

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