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'Wave' Tells A True Story Of Survival And Loss In The 2004 Tsunami

Sonali Deraniyagala lost her husband, two sons and parents to the Indian Ocean tsunami that claimed the lives of more than 200,000 people. Her new memoir recounts the events of that fateful day.
WAMU 88.5

Predicting The Future With 'Big Data'

"Big data" promises to tap into the vast amount of digital information humans now generate to do more than ever before, including predicting who might commit a crime to when a heart attack might occur. Our guests explore the possibilities and dangers of a future in which everything we do is quantified.

NPR

A Multimedia Journey Through 'The Persian Square'

Iran is often portrayed as dangerous, violent and politically unstable. But that's only one side of the story. Art, technology and culture are central to Persian identity. The new digital book The Persian Square shows surprising ties between Iran and the U.S. Host Michel Martin speaks with author and NPR Senior Producer Iran Davar Ardalan.
WAMU 88.5

Taiye Selasi: "Ghana Must Go"

Taiye Selasi joins Diane to discuss her new novel, "Ghana Must Go." It's the story of an African immigrant family brought together by their father's death after he abandoned them as children.

NPR

Book News: 'New Yorker' Plagiarist's Book Pulled From Shelves

Also: The best books coming out this week; Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, the movie; and cakes that look like classic works of literature.
NPR

Three-Minute Fiction Readings: 'Three Little Words' And 'The Escape'

NPR's Bob Mondello and Tamara Keith read selections from Round 10 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest. Sunday's stories are "The Escape" by Lisa Turano of Asheville, N.C., and "Three Little Words" by Rick Hodges of Arlington, Va.
NPR

Time Rules In Jamaica Kincaid's New Novel, 'See Now Then'

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Sweet is anything but sweet. In Jamaica Kincaid's first new novel in 10 years, she traces the unraveling of a marriage. See Now Then follows the joy, pain and destruction that time can wreak on a union.
NPR

Family Keeps Jewish Soulfood Alive At New York 'Appetizing' Store

When it opened its name alone made it different, advertising the shared ownership of the family's daughters, instead of sons. Today, the shop, which specializes in smoked fish, continues to thrive.
NPR

Secretly Working To Win The War In 'Atomic City'

The U.S. military called its Oak Ridge, Tenn., facility "Site X." During World War II, thousands of workers there enriched uranium for the first atom bomb — even if they didn't know it at the time. Author Denise Kiernan's new book, The Girls of Atomic City, follows some of the women who worked there.

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