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NPR

In Book's Trial Of U.S. Justice System, Wealth Gap Is Exhibit A

Journalist Matt Taibbi investigates the differences between punishment for white-collar and blue-collar crimes in The Divide. He also questions beliefs about who is "appropriate for jail."
NPR

Peter Matthiessen, Co-Founder Of The Paris Review, Dies At 86

Matthiessen was a spy, a naturalist, a well-regarded activist and a three-time winner of the National Book Award — for both fiction and nonfiction. He died of acute myeloid leukemia.
NPR

Lydia Davis' New Collection Has Stories Shorter Than This Headline

The award-winning author is known for her brevity, and Can't And Won't doesn't disappoint. Davis tells NPR's Rachel Martin that the works of Russell Edson inspired her to write super-short stories.
NPR

Peter Matthiessen Dies At 86; Wrote Of Travels In The Natural World

Author Peter Matthiessen, who used fiction and nonfiction to explore how man relates to nature, has died at 86. The revered naturalist and novelist had been suffering from leukemia.
NPR

'In Paradise,' Matthiessen Considers Our Capacity For Cruelty

At 86, Matthiessen has written what he says "may be his last word." In Paradise, a novel about a visit to a Nazi extermination camp, caps a career spanning six decades and 33 books.
NPR

Biographer Explains How John Updike 'Captured America'

Adam Begley says Updike created an everyman in his Rabbit book series, and inhabited him fully, "allowing that everyman's senses to be totally open to the American experience."
NPR

A Century Of History In The Life Of An Ordinary Indian

Ayya's Accounts: A Ledger of Hope in Modern India chronicles the life of an ordinary man in extraordinary times. NPR's Scott Simon talks to author Anand Pandian about his subject, his grandfather.
WAMU 88.5

New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff

The New Yorker's longtime cartoon editor joins us to talk about the serious business of being funny.

NPR

Dinaw Mengestu Embraces The Vastness Of Love And War

Meg Wolitzer says All Our Names, told in the alternating voices of two lovers, is a subtle masterpiece. It tackles huge themes — relationships, violence, identity, racism — but never overreaches.
NPR

In The 1870s And '80s, Being A Pedestrian Was Anything But

Huge crowds packed arenas to watch the world's best pedestrians walk in circles for six days at a time. And trainers encouraged the athletes to drink champagne — at the time considered a stimulant.

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