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Krauthammer's Tactical Advice For The Republican Party

Charles Krauthammer once was a psychiatrist and a self-described "Great Society liberal." Now he's a Pulitzer Prize-winning, nationally syndicated conservative columnist. His new book, Things That Matter, presents a selection of his writings from three decades spent observing politics and culture.

Graham Nash Tell-All Has Sex, Drugs, Rock...And No Axe To Grind

Meredith Ochs reviews a memoir from musician Graham Nash, one fourth of the group Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. She says the book gives context to the songs that came to define a generation.
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Candy Culture

Halloween brings little goblins and ghouls to front doors in search of one thing: candy. We explore the history of candy and how these treats have shaped the American sweet tooth.


'Identical' Stumbles Outside The Courtroom

In Identical, Scott Turow opens a cold case involving a set of twins and a murder long thought solved. Whatever the premise may lead you to believe, though, this novel is neither funny nor especially thrilling. Reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin explains that the book is at its best in the courtroom, but elsewhere, it plods.

At Guantanamo, 'Sketching' Defendants, Witnesses And KSM's Nose

Janet Hamlin was the only courtroom sketch artist allowed at the Guantanamo Bay military tribunals. Her work has been collected in a new book, Sketching Guantanamo — and she tells NPR's Renee Montagne that getting Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's nose right ended up being a challenge.

More Is More In Donna Tartt's Believable, Behemoth 'Goldfinch'

The author of The Secret History returns with a novel about art, love and loss that's drawn comparisons to Oliver Twist and the Harry Potter series. Reviewer Meg Wolitzer says The Goldfinch marks a departure from Tartt's previous work, but it's a rich, absorbing read — all 771 pages of it.

'Wheelmen' Exposes Doping Culture And The Armstrong 'Conspiracy'

Wall Street Journal reporters Reed Albergotti and Vanessa O'Connell say that champion cyclist Lance Armstrong was at the center of "the greatest sports conspiracy ever." Their book chronicles everything from group blood transfusions on the team bus to extensive efforts to silence and intimidate those who might expose the abuse.

If You're Looking To Read 'Lady Things,' Choose Jezebel Over Jones

Bridget Jones hasn't aged well. At 51, she's the "geriatric mum" of two small children, and finds herself yearning to plunge back into dating. Critic Maureen Corrigan says if you're looking for jolly feminist cultural commentary, you'd be better off reading a witty "encyclopedia of lady things" from the creators of the website Jezebel.

'Murdoch's World': Inside One Of The Last Old Media Empires

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. now stretches from Australia to India, Great Britain and the United States. In a new book, NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik looks at how News Corp. publications covered the company's hacking scandals, and its punitive attitude toward critics.

Scott Adams Explains 'How To Fail At Almost Everything' (Except Dilbert)

Adams managed to turn his failure at office work into a gigantic success — a syndicated comic strip about a hapless, cubicle-bound engineer. In his new book, How To Fail At Almost Everything And Still Win Big, Adams offers some sage advice such as: "Goals are for losers."