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On The Road To Rock Excess: Why The '60s Really Ended In 1973

In the new book What You Want Is in the Limo, author Michael Walker argues that a peak year in the careers of Led Zeppelin, Alice Cooper and The Who also marked a cultural shift — from the peace, love and understanding of 1960-era music to '70s rock decadence.
NPR

Pioneering 'Masters Of Sex' Brought Science To The Bedroom

William Masters and Virginia Johnson became famous in the 1960s for their research into the physiology of human sexuality. In Masters of Sex, biographer Thomas Maier explores the duo's research methods, which for years remained shrouded in secrecy.
NPR

Book News: Campaigner For Jane Austen Banknote Deluged With Threats

Also: Gary Shteyngart tests out Google Glass; Fifty Shades of Grey and the rise in handcuff accidents.
NPR

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Journalist Alison Stewart chronicles the history of Dunbar High School in her new book, First Class. She says the Washington, D.C., school — which has graduated Army generals, Cabinet members and musicians — can serve as a model for urban schools today.
NPR

'Coming Clean' About Growing Up In A Hoarding Household

Kimberly Rae Miller grew up among piles of junk. Doors wouldn't close, stacks of paper turned to sludge, and the pool was filled with muck; her father was an extreme hoarder. In her new memoir, Coming Clean, Miller writes candidly about the chaos in her home.
WAMU 88.5

A Conversation With Author Tana French

Irish author Tana French recently won the prestigious Los Angeles Times Book Prize for thrillers. But her plots are often about more than solving grisly murders. Her fourth book, “Broken Harbor,” is a psychological thriller that also explores a downtrodden Ireland after the fall of the Celtic Tiger. Tana French joins Diane to talk about her best-selling novels and how her career as an actress influences her writing.

NPR

'Looking For Palestine': A Once-Split Identity Becomes Whole

Najla Said's father, Edward Said, was an outspoken professor and prominent voice for Palestinian independence. Yet Najla's life felt less grounded. Growing up as a Palestinian-Lebanese-American in New York City, she balanced competing cultures and multiple lives, searching for a place to fit in.
NPR

'Rural Life' Adds Natural Color To 'The Grey Lady'

Despite being a big city paper, The New York Times has featured Verlyn Klinkenborg's editorials about life on his farm for years. A new collection of his essays, More Scenes from the Rural Life, offers even the city slickers a chance to daydream about cows.
NPR

In 'The Panopticon,' They're Always Watching

Jenni Fagan's debut novel, The Panopticon, is a creepy and troubled portrait of a girl lost in the system. The plot is loosely based on Fagan's experience growing up in foster care.
NPR

'The Telling Room': This Cheese Stands Alone

The Telling Room is a tale of friendship, betrayal, mythmaking, ancient history and, yes, really fabulous cheese. Author Michael Paterniti tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer that the more he learned about cheesemaker Ambrosio Molinos, the less he wanted the story to end.

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