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After Tragedy, Lost Live On In 'Maid's Version' Of The Story

Daniel Woodrell's new novel explores the lingering consequences of an explosion in an Ozarks dance hall that kills 42 people. It wasn't an accident, but the book isn't about a hunt for the murderer. Instead, reviewer Ellah Allfrey says, it's a remarkable study of a surviving sister's life and grief.
NPR

For Novelist Jonathan Lethem, Radicalism Runs In The Family

His new book, Dissident Gardens, follows three generations of an activist family, from Rose, a secular Jew and communist, to Sergius, her commune-raised grandson. The book is fiction, but its characters were inspired by Lethem's own family story.
WAMU 88.5

Jhumpa Lahiri: "The Lowland"

"The Lowland" is a new novel from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jhumpa Lahiri. Based on true events, it's the story of two brothers growing up in post-colonial India and the limits of love and sacrifice.

WAMU 88.5

Andre Dubus III: "Dirty Love"

The best-selling author of "House of Sand and Fog" returns to fiction with a collection of linked novellas that explore conflicting needs of power, fear and fantasy.

NPR

Book News: Why Batwoman Can't Get Married

Also: What "immigrant fiction" means; Wild author Cheryl Strayed on finding her half-sister; the best books coming out this week.
NPR

'Five Days' Of Ambiguous Morality At Katrina-Hit Hospital

Sheri Fink's Five Days At Memorial, describes the horrific conditions at a New Orleans hospital shortly after Hurricane Katrina. Facing floodwaters and corporate mismanagement, some staffers euthanized sick patients. Fink's judgment of those actions is admirably — and frustratingly — nuanced.
NPR

10 Years, One Book: Norman Rush Brews A Literary Distillation

In his third, much anticipated novel, Subtle Bodies, Rush takes the reader inside the most intimate parts of friendship. The author says his goal for this book, which took him nearly a decade to finish, was to produce his first concentrated piece of writing.
NPR

The 'Wild' Story Of Cheryl Strayed And Her Long-Lost Half-Sister

Strayed's half-sister checked Wild out of the public library because she thought it looked like an interesting travel book. She was about halfway through the first chapter when she realized that she and the author shared the same father.
NPR

'Be Mine': Love And Identity Tangled In Tehran

In her debut novel, Iranian-American Sara Farizan tells the story of two teenage girls, secretly in love. Sahar faces a crisis when she discovers Nasrin is engaged, and considers gender-reassignment surgery as a way for them to stay together. Farizan speaks with NPR's Jacki Lyden about the book and her own struggle with her sexual orientation.
NPR

Suspicious? In 'United States Of Paranoia,' It's Not Just You

Author Jesse Walker argues that believing in shadowy cabals and ominous secrets isn't just for people on the margins — it's as American as apple pie. He says that our nation's paranoia stretches back to the colonial era, and that some conspiracy theories are believed by a majority of Americans.

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