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The Competing Interests Behind Smokey Bear And The Crying Indian

The company behind iconic public service campaigns like Smokey Bear and McGruff the Crime Dog has been around since the 1940s. But how much is really known about the Ad Council? Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks to author Wendy Melillo about her book How McGruff and the Crying Indian Changed America.
NPR

Diane Ravitch Rebukes Education Activists' 'Reign Of Error'

Former Assistant Secretary of Education Diane Ravitch spent years advocating for an overhaul of the American education system. Now she criticizes changes that she used to support, like charter schools and school choice. She explains her reasoning in Reign of Error, her new book on the pitfalls of privatizing education.
WAMU 88.5

Bill Bryson: "One Summer: America, 1927"

Bestselling author Bill Bryson joins us to talk about his newest book, "One Summer: America, 1927." He details the events that transfixed the nation in that year including Charles Lindbergh's transatlantic flight, Babe Ruth in the batter's box and epic floods in the Mississippi basin. Join us to talk about America in 1927 and how many of the key news stories of that year resonate today.

WAMU 88.5

Bookend: Poet Dan Vera Blends Spanish, English Influences In Latest Work

In this month's look at D.C.'s literary scene, we'll talk with writer Dan Vera about how how his Cuban- and Mexican-American roots influence his work.

WAMU 88.5

This Week On Metro Connection: Coming Of Age

This week we'll bring you stories of how we grow up, grow wise, and come into our own.

NPR

David Dinkins: Leading New York Is The 'Greatest Job There Is'

Dinkins served as New York City's first African-American mayor, but his rise through the political ranks came with hard lessons. He chronicles that period, and his political journey, in his new book, A Mayor's Life: Governing New York's Gorgeous Mosaic.
NPR

Book Review: 'The Woman Who Lost Her Soul'

Alan Cheuse reviews The Woman Who Lost Her Soul by Bob Shacochis. The author's first novel in twenty years traverses the globe and spans decades, and is engaging for all 700-plus pages.
NPR

NFL's A Nonprofit? Author Says It's Time For Football Reform

Despite pro football's sky-high profits, taxpayers subsidize the industry with $1 billion each year. In The King of Sports, Gregg Easterbrook argues for some serious reforms, including incentives for college graduation rates and a new approach to youth football leagues.
NPR

'Reaped' Is A Reminder That No One Is Promised Tomorrow

In Men We Reaped, Jesmyn Ward recalls the deaths of five young men in her life, which she believes were all connected to being poor and black in the rural South. "It made me feel that I wasn't promised some long life. ... That's not a given for me."
NPR

Stephen King On Getting Scared: 'Nothing Like Your First Time'

Was King's 1977 The Shining your first fictional scare? Now, after nearly 40 years, King has followed up his horror tale of a little boy and a haunted hotel with a sequel called Doctor Sleep. "I wanted to revisit Danny and see what he was like as a grown-up," King says.

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