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Two Outcasts Form An Artistic Bond In 'Mr. Mac And Me'

Painter's daughter Esther Freud weaves her own experiences into the story of a lonely little boy in a British seacoast town, who befriends the great Art Nouveau designer Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

When Pop Broke Up With Jazz

For the first half of the 20th century, Tin Pan Alley songwriters like Irving Berlin and the Gershwins dominated pop music. By the the 1950s, tastes had changed, and the music changed with them.

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid?

Scientists think an asteroid killed the dinosaurs. In today's extinction, humans are the culprit. Originally broadcast Feb. 12, 2014.
WAMU 88.5

From Felony To A Future: D.C. Man Works To Find A New Path In Life

Robert Barksdale was 16 years old when he was charged with armed robbery. Today, he says he's on a better path in life.


Debate: Is Amazon The Reader's Friend?

Two teams of editors and writers, including best-selling author Scott Turow, face off over Amazon's influence over the publishing industry, in the latest debate from Intelligence Squared U.S.

The Past, Present And Future Of High-Stakes Testing

Steve Inskeep talks with NPR Ed's Anya Kamenetz about her book, The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed with Standardized Testing — But You Don't Have to Be.

Bulgakov's 'Master' Still Strikes A Chord In Today's Russia

Russian author Mikhail Bulgakov's classic, The Master and Margarita, ridiculed Soviet leaders and bureaucracy. It wasn't published until 27 years after his death, but it still resonates with Russians.

Book Review: 'The Jaguar's Children' By John Vaillant

Alan Cheuse reviews The Jaguar's Children by John Vaillant.

In 'The Evil Hours,' A Journalist Shares His Struggle With PTSD

While embedded with troops in Iraq, David Morris almost died when a Humvee he was riding in ran over a roadside bomb. His book explores the history and science of post-traumatic stress disorder.

A 'Guantanamo Diary' From A Prisoner Still On The Inside

In the first memoir from a prisoner still being held at Guantanamo, Mohamedou Ould Slahi tells how he went from his native Mauritania to joining al-Qaida in Afghanistan to the U.S. prison in Cuba.