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How Our Stone Age Bodies Struggle To Stay Healthy In Modern Times

In The Story of the Human Body, evolutionary biologist Daniel Lieberman explains how our bodies haven't adapted to modern conditions. The result is "mismatched diseases" — ailments that occur because our bodies weren't designed for the environments in which we now live.
NPR

How Two Brothers Waged A 'Secret World War' In The 1950s

Sharing power in the Eisenhower administration, John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles were the forefathers of using covert operations to upset foreign governments. Journalist Stephen Kinzer, who wrote a book on the siblings, says Americans are still paying the price for them.
NPR

'Size 12' Finds The Right Mix Of Snark And Drama

Author Meg Cabot, best know for The Princess Diaries, has a new novel. Cabot speaks with host Rachel Martin about the heroine of The Bride Wore Size 12, who lives on a college campus and investigates a murder while planning a wedding.
NPR

'Faithful Scribe': Tracing Ancestry Through Pakistan's History

In The Faithful Scribe, Shahan Mufti examines the history of Pakistan and that nation's relationship to the U.S. He interweaves the story of his own family with the tumultuous story of the nation. Mufti talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the future of the world's first Islamic democracy.
NPR

From Kolbasa To Borscht, 'Soviet Cooking' Tells A Personal History

Anya von Bremzen's new memoir is a delicious narrative of memory and cuisine in 20th century Soviet Union. She writes about her family's own history and contemplates the nation's "complicated, even tortured, relationship with food."
NPR

On Eliot's 125th, His 'Waste Land' Hasn't Lost Its Glamour

This year marks the 125th birthday of Nobel Prize-winning poet T.S. Eliot. To celebrate, a re-issue of the first edition of his seminal poem has just been published, with an introduction by New Yorker poetry editor Paul Muldoon. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Muldoon about the poem's lasting influence.
NPR

News From Lake Wobegon: Garrison Keillor Has A New Book Of Poetry

The host of A Prairie Home Companion and The Writer's Almanac has published his first poetry collection called O, What a Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic and Profound. "I love rhymes," Keillor says. "I love to write a poem about New York and rhyme 'oysters' with 'The Cloisters.'"
NPR

'If It Swings': An Asian-American Jazzman's Pioneering Career

Saxophonist Gabe Baltazar is one of the last living links to an era when Asian-Americans began to make a name for themselves in jazz. Now, at the age of 83, he's sharing his story in an autobiography.
NPR

I, Spy: Valerie Plame Makes Her Fiction Debut In CIA Thriller

In Blowback, Plame channels her expertise in nuclear counterproliferation into a "realistic portrait" of a female covert agent. Plame confesses that there's a lot of downtime in the life of a spy, but still, the CIA is "the world's biggest dating agency."
NPR

A 'Return' To A Mexico More Dangerous Than Before

Alan Cheuse reviews a crime novel set in Mexico, The Return by Michael Gruber.

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