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Richard Blanco: "For All Of Us, One Today"

Richard Blanco is the youngest inaugural poet ever. He is also the first immigrant, first Latino and first openly gay man chosen for the honor. His journey from Cuban immigrant in Miami to inaugural poet for President Obama.

NPR

Female Friendship Puts 'New' Angle On Italian Classism And Machismo

Bound by the confines of gender and finances, two young women take divergent paths in Elena Ferrante's The Story of a New Name, the second book in her "Neapolitan Novels" trilogy. Critic John Powers believes the bold, expansive series to be semi-autobiographical, a revelation from a secretive author who won't reveal her true name.
NPR

Author Catherine Chung: 'I Want To Embrace The Things That I Am'

The author of Forgotten Country went from crunching numbers to writing, though she says words were always her first love. Her novel explores the tenuous lines between freedom and selfishness.
NPR

From Sulking To Sanctions, A Street-Level View Of Life In Iran

Journalist Hooman Majd's new book, The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay, was inspired by the year he and his young American family spent in Tehran, where Majd was born. He tells Fresh Air about the country's long-standing tradition of sulking, and what sets Tehran apart from most other Islamic metropolises.
NPR

Amy Tan Weaves Family Mystery Into 'Valley Of Amazement'

Speculation about her grandmother's life in China in the early 1900s provided Tan inspiration for her latest novel, out Tuesday. Valley is an opus that covers half of a tumultuous century, ranges across two continents and involves love, deceit, forgiveness and, ultimately, redemption.
NPR

Teddy Roosevelt's 'Bully Pulpit' Isn't The Platform It Once Was

Roosevelt described the power of the presidency to shape public opinion as "The Bully Pulpit." That's also the title of a new book from presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, in which she explains the unique relationships Roosevelt forged with reporters.
NPR

With Fading Memory, Terry Pratchett Revisits 'Carpet People'

At the age of 59, the British science-fiction writer was diagnosed with a form of Alzheimer's. Now he's publishing an edited version of a book he first wrote when he was 17. He can't read because of his disease, but Pratchett continues writing — with the help of dictation software.
NPR

Scientist's Scuba Trip Sparks Search For 'Vanished' WWII Plane

On Sept. 1, 1944, a B-24 bomber went down in the South Pacific. The wreckage, and the airmen, seemed to disappear. Almost 50 years later, a scientist on vacation in Palau found an airplane wing and went on an obsessive, decade-long quest to find what happened to the plane. Author Wil S. Hylton joins NPR to discuss his new book on the mystery.
NPR

A Comedian's Voyage To 'The Membrane Between Life And Death'

Tweeter-comedian Rob Delaney's new book is a significant departure from the 140-character format that made him famous. The memoir also showcases a more serious side. Delaney talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the struggles with alcoholism and depression that eventually led him to comedy.
NPR

Fosse's Genius: Working Even As He Was Dying

The choreographer known for jazz hands and the bump and grind was not afraid of death as much as he feared not being brilliant. Host Scott Simon speaks with Sam Wasson, author of Fosse, a new biography about the iconic dancer, choreographer, screenwriter and director.

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