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Book News: Slam Poet's 'OCD' Love Poem Makes Waves

Also: Katherine Boo, Robert Hass win PEN Literary Awards; gender at The New York Review of Books; John Cheever's prison visit.
NPR

In 'Alphabet' Mysteries, 'S' Is Really For Santa Barbara

Private investigator Kinsey Millhone is one of the most well-known characters in modern crime fiction, but there's another star in Sue Grafton's thrillers: the fictional city of Santa Teresa, based on Santa Barbara, Calif.
NPR

Shipping: The 'Invisible Industry' That Clothes And Feeds You

Rose George spent several weeks aboard a container ship to research Ninety Percent of Everything, her book about the shipping industry. She writes, "There are more than one hundred thousand ships at sea carrying all the solids, liquids and gases that we need to live."
NPR

'Happiness, Like Water' Based On Nigerian-American Writer's Reality

Born in Nigeria, Chinelo Okparanta was raised in the U.S. by her parents who were Jehovah's Witnesses. She talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about writing the truth about her home country, even if it's an ugly truth.
NPR

Book News: Handwriting Offers Clues In Shakespeare Debate

Also: Foreign Policy's blog The Cable says there's fresh evidence the CIA kept tabs on Noam Chomsky; new books from Dave Eggers and Ron Burgundy.
NPR

Tina Brown On The Dark Side Of Innovation And Progress

Renee Montagne talks with Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast, for the Morning Edition regular feature, "Word of Mouth." Brown has three reads looking at the dark side to notions of innovation and progress.
NPR

Book Review: 'Return To Oakpine'

Alan Cheuse recommends a new novel by Ron Carlson. Return to Oakpine is about a man trying to go home again — to a town in Wyoming — in middle age.
NPR

Book News: Museum, Kelly Clarkson Vie For Jane Austen's Ring

Also: Thomas Pynchon's "Bugs Bunny" teeth; N.Y. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's book deal; and The New York Review of Books' lady problem.
NPR

Author Kiese Laymon Finally Comprehends His Mother's Worry

Writer Kiese Laymon has had the kind of year every first-time author dreams. He's had two books published to critical acclaim. But to get where he is now, he experienced a rough patch. In an essay,"The Worst of White Folks," he recalls why he and his mother were at loggerheads.
NPR

Heading West: The Gritty, Luminous 'Son Of A Gun'

If the town of Tombstone, Ariz., sounds familiar, it probably has to do with what happened there in 1881 — the year of the infamous gunfight between lawman Wyatt Earp and a rival gang. A new memoir by Justin St. Germain weaves the story of the O.K. Corral into another, more personal tale.

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