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NPR

American Muslim Men Balance Faith And Love In 'Salaam'

American Muslim author Haroon Moghul was bound and determined to go to his high school prom — and he wrote about it for the new essay collection, Salaam, Love: American Muslim Men on Love, Sex and Intimacy. Moghul tells NPR's Rachel Martin that he thought the experience might help him understand himself better.
NPR

Anna Quindlen Spins A Tale Of Middle-Aged Reinvention

Still Life With Bread Crumbs follows a photographer who is no longer married, no longer needed as much by her grown son and no longer as successful as she used to be. When her funds start to dry up, she heads to a small, rural town for a fresh start.
NPR

Growing Up Muslim In Massachusetts

What exactly do Muslim men want? That's the theme of a book of essays coming out this week called Salaam, Love. Writer Haroon Moghul tackles growing up as an Indian Muslim kid in Massachusetts in an essay in the book. He talks with NPR's Rachel Martin.
NPR

Amazon Publishing Launches Christian Imprint

The online superstore Amazon has announced it will publish Christian books under a new imprint called Waterfall Press. Yale Divinity School seminarian and writer Win Bassett tells NPR's Rachel Martin that Christian books are a significant piece of the publishing pie in America.
NPR

Southern Sisters Take The 'Dark Road To Mercy'

Wiley Cash's new novel is a southern literary thriller that follows two sisters whose errant father breaks them out of the foster system. In This Dark Road to Mercy, the sisters are on the run from the law, and more sinister forces. Cash speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about the book.
WAMU 88.5

Alcatraz 11: Vietnam's "Defiant" POWs

Kojo hears the inspiring story of the 11 American prisoners-of-war who endured and heroically resisted years of brutal treatment at Vietnam's Hoa Lo prison and its sub camp "Alcatraz."

NPR

Celebration Is In The Air. Or Is That Just Snow?

Patty Chang Anker recommends a cookbook that eases the anxieties of anyone trying to cook Chinese-American meals, and Lev Grossman reminds us that there is a Seussian storm comparable to the one that shut down Atlanta this week.
NPR

Midwestern Memoir Tracks 'Flyover Lives' Of Author's Forebears

Diane Johnson often writes about American heroines living in France, but when she began her memoir, she found herself drawn back to her native ground in America's heartland. Critic Maureen Corrigan says Flyover Lives "lets scenes and conversations speak for themselves, accruing power as they lodge in readers' minds."
WAMU 88.5

John Rizzo: Thirty Years As The CIA's Lawyer

As one of the most prominent CIA lawyers in U.S. history, John Rizzo oversaw some of the agency's most controversial programs, from interrogation techniques that included waterboarding to targeted drone strikes. He joins Kojo to discuss his 30-year career with the American spy agency.

NPR

How One Woman's Faith Stopped A School Shooting

Antoinette Tuff prevented a mass shooting at an elementary school last year by calming down the mentally ill gunman. Tuff speaks with host Michel Martin about her new memoir Prepared for a Purpose, and that fateful day in Georgia.

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