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'Such A Magical Time': Harry Potter Fans Recall Growing Up Alongside Wizard

A new play about Harry Potter, written by J.K. Rowling, begins previews this week with Harry as a grown up. Grown, too, is the "Potter Generation," the kids who were the first to read the books when they came out. Their experience — maturing alongside Harry — was unique.
NPR

Revisiting The Tenure Of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, The 'Jewish Jefferson'

One hundred years ago, Brandeis became the first Jewish justice on the Supreme Court. Author Jeffrey Rosen says that Brandeis was also the most far-seeing progressive justice of the 20th century.
NPR

In 'Homegoing,' A Saga Of A Family United By Blood, Separated By Slavery

Yaa Gyasi's debut short story collection begins in 18th century Ghana, where the slave trade separates two half sisters. Critic Maureen Corrigan calls Homegoing a strong work with versatile language.
NPR

A Neuroscientist Tackles 'Why Diets Make Us Fat'

Why don't traditional diets work for many people? Blame your brain, suggests Sandra Aamodt. Her new book delves into the science of why eating and weight have become such a sizable problem.
WAMU 88.5

Barbara Boxer: "The Art Of Tough"

Senator Barbara Boxer is retiring after 34 years in Congress, but insists she won't stop fighting for the causes she believes in. In a new memoir, she chronicles her political career spanning four decades and shares what she's learned about being tough in politics.

NPR

Nutrition In 'The First 1,000 Days' Of Life Can Shape A Child's Future

In his new book, journalist Roger Thurow chronicles the obstacles that women around the globe face in raising healthy babies.
NPR

'Black Gods Of The Asphalt' Takes Basketball Beyond The Court

When you see a bunch of guys playing street basketball you might not just see a game. In his new book Black Gods of the Asphalt author Onaje Woodbine shows how it's also a spiritual experience.
NPR

Muslims Are Just The Latest In History Of Scapegoats, Author Says

In his book Scapegoats, human rights lawyer Arsalan Iftikhar says Muslims are the newest group in the U.S. to be ostracized. But there is a long history of groups before them facing discrimination.
NPR

Cat Videos And All, The Internet May Be Humankind's Greatest Masterpiece

In her new book Magic and Loss, Virginia Heffernan makes the case for the Internet as art. Just look at Twitter, she says. "It's hard to think of a time when poetry was more powerful."
NPR

Exploring The 'Quiet New York' With Emma Straub

Straub's new book, Modern Lovers, is a tale of old friendships, secrets and family entanglements set in a part of Brooklyn writers often ignore: leafy, largely residential Ditmas Park.

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