Books | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Books

RSS Feed
NPR

The Ethics Of Torture, Explored In A Painful Fable

This week, the Senate released a report that details the interrogation techniques used by the CIA after Sept. 11. Author Laila Lalami grapples with the questions it raises by turning to literature.
NPR

Book Review: 'The Convert's Song' By Sebastian Rotella

Alan Cheuse reviews "The Convert's Song" by Sebastian Rotella.
NPR

When Big Brother Is An Evil, Jewelry-Obsessed Necromancer

Lord of the Rings fans wanted to build a giant Eye of Sauron atop a skyscraper in Moscow, a place that already can make you feel you're being watched. The Orthodox church had officials scrap the plan.
NPR

Memories Of An Ironworker On The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the opening of the New York landmark, we hear from Bob Walsh, a builder who worked on the structure, and writer Gay Talese, who chronicled its construction.
NPR

Richard Pryor, A Comedy Pioneer Who Was 'Always Whittling On Dynamite'

Scott Saul's new book, Becoming Richard Pryor, describes how Pryor went from being raised by a grandmother, who was a bootlegger and madam, to being a transformative figure in entertainment.
NPR

The Risks, Rewards And Mysteries Of Reporting From Iran

Nazila Fathi covered Iran for The New York Times until she feared her arrest was imminent. She then fled her homeland. Her new book, The Lonely War, tells of the challenges of reporting on Iran.
NPR

Join The Morning Edition Book Club: We're Reading 'Deep Down Dark'

Welcome to the first meeting of NPR's new book club! We're reading Hector Tobar's account of 33 men who were trapped for 69 days in a Chilean mine. Send us your questions; we may read them on-air.
NPR

Book Review: 'Skylight' By Jose Saramago

Alan Cheuse reviews Skylight by Jose Saramago.
NPR

Jacqueline Woodson On Growing Up, Coming Out And Saying Hi To Strangers

Woodson won the National Book Award for young people's literature for her memoir Brown Girl Dreaming. She says that growing up in South Carolina, she knew that the safest place was with her family.
NPR

WWII By The Books: The Pocket-Size Editions That Kept Soldiers Reading

In the 1940s, U.S. publishers printed paperbacks — everything from romances to Westerns — that were designed for battle. Molly Guptill Manning explores their history in When Books Went to War.

Pages