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NPR

For Actress Maria Bello, Family May Be Complicated, But 'Love Is Love'

In her memoir Whatever ... Love is Love, Bello describes the evolution of her "modern family," which includes her romantic partner (a woman), her adolescent son and her son's father.
NPR

A Neurosurgeon Reflects On The 'Awe And Mystery' Of The Brain

In his memoir Do No Harm, Henry Marsh confesses to the uncertainties he's dealt with as a surgeon, revisits his triumphs and failures and reflects on the enigmas of the brain and consciousness.
NPR

Lovely Illustrations From The Story Of A Black Boy Who Dreams Of Going To Mars

The authors — who are black and queer — didn't see a lot of kids like them in children's books growing up. They wanted to help change that.
NPR

Post-Ron Swanson, Nick Offerman Has The 'Gumption' To Be Himself

"I've never accused myself of being manly," Offerman says, noting his real-life persona is different from his Parks and Recreation character. His book is a set of essays about people who inspire him.
NPR

Novelist Mat Johnson Explores The 'Optical Illusion' Of Being Biracial

Johnson, the son of an African-American mother and an Irish-American father, has just written Loving Day, a funny, sometimes absurd look at what it means to grow up mixed heritage in the U.S.
NPR

This Weekend, Navigate The Changing World Of 'Vikram Lall'

M.G. Vassanji's book, The In-Between World of Vikram Lall, wrestles with questions of identity in a story about a young Indian boy coming of age in 1950s Kenya, a time of great political unrest.
NPR

What If The Drought Doesn't End? 'The Water Knife' Is One Possibility

It's Chinatown meets Mad Max in writer Paolo Bacigalupi's new desert dystopia, filled with climate refugees, powerful state border patrols, and secret agents called water knives.
NPR

'Dietland': A 'Fight Club' For Women That Reclaims The Word 'Fat'

Sarai Walker's new novel centers on Alicia "Plum" Kettle, a 20-something writer who's saving up for weight loss surgery when she joins an underground feminist collective.
NPR

'Mislaid' Punctures Notions Of Gender And Race

In Nell Zink's new book, Mislaid, a young woman marries her male professor. It's 1965. She likes women; he likes men. What follows is a biting satire about gender, race and sexuality.
NPR

How 'Gatsby' Went From A Moldering Flop To A Great American Novel

In So We Read On, Maureen Corrigan looks at the story behind The Great Gatsby, from F. Scott Fitzgerald's life to the era in which it's set. Originally broadcast Sept. 8, 2014.

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