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Author Of 'Bridge To Terabithia': Messages Are Poison To Fiction

Katherine Paterson describes the inspiration behind her best-known children's book, as well as tales from her childhood in China and missionary work in Japan, in her new memoir, Stories of My Life.
NPR

In Troubled Times, Does 'The Black Church' Still Matter?

As the nation endures a season of racial tension, NPR's Michel Martin talks about the mission of the black church and whether it remains relevant in the social justice movement.
NPR

Billions Of Years Go By, All In The Same 'Room'

NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Richard McGuire about his arresting graphic novel, Here. It's an austere, profound journey backward and forward in time through the life of a single room.
NPR

Staff Favorite: An Interview With Poet Stephen Dunn

Weekend Edition is picking its favorite interviews of 2014. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to editor Barrie Hardymon about her selection — an interview with poet Stephen Dunn.
NPR

At 86, Poet Donald Hall Writes On, But Leaves Verse Behind

The former U.S. poet laureate says he can't write poetry any more, but still has some prose in him. In a new book, Essays After Eighty, he considers his art, his beard and his experience growing old.
NPR

Journalist Documents The Many 'Trials Of Oscar Pistorius'

Oscar Pistorius stunned the world when he ran on prosthetic legs in the 2012 Olympics, then shot his girlfriend dead months later. NPR's Scott Simon asks John Carlin about his new book on the athlete.
NPR

First-Generation 'Boston Girl' Becomes Career Woman In Diamant's Latest

Anita Diamant — who also authored The Red Tent — tells the story of Addie Baum in her latest novel. Baum is a Jewish girl, born in 1900 to immigrant parents in Boston's North End.
NPR

How Girls Are Developing Earlier In An Age Of 'New Puberty'

Two doctors wrote a book that probes the environmental, biological and socioeconomic factors contributing to early puberty. These girls face risks like anxiety and depression, one author says.
NPR

P.D. James Believed Mysteries Were Made Of Clues, Not Coincidences

The best-selling author died Thursday. She was 94. In 1987, James told Terry Gross that while the "shock of finding the bodies is important" in her novels, she personally doesn't like "messy lives."
NPR

Historian Illustrates Racial Intolerance In The Northeast In Post-War U.S.

In his new book All Eyes Are Upon Us, Jason Sokol writes about how Northerners were blind to patterns of segregation, discrimination and racial violence in such states as New York and Massachusetts.

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