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Revisiting The Tenure Of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, The 'Jewish Jefferson'

One hundred years ago, Brandeis became the first Jewish justice on the Supreme Court. Author Jeffrey Rosen says that Brandeis was also the most far-seeing progressive justice of the 20th century.
NPR

A Neuroscientist Tackles 'Why Diets Make Us Fat'

Why don't traditional diets work for many people? Blame your brain, suggests Sandra Aamodt. Her new book delves into the science of why eating and weight have become such a sizable problem.
WAMU 88.5

Barbara Boxer: "The Art Of Tough"

Senator Barbara Boxer is retiring after 34 years in Congress, but insists she won't stop fighting for the causes she believes in. In a new memoir, she chronicles her political career spanning four decades and shares what she's learned about being tough in politics.

NPR

'Black Gods Of The Asphalt' Takes Basketball Beyond The Court

When you see a bunch of guys playing street basketball you might not just see a game. In his new book Black Gods of the Asphalt author Onaje Woodbine shows how it's also a spiritual experience.
NPR

Muslims Are Just The Latest In History Of Scapegoats, Author Says

In his book Scapegoats, human rights lawyer Arsalan Iftikhar says Muslims are the newest group in the U.S. to be ostracized. But there is a long history of groups before them facing discrimination.
NPR

Cat Videos And All, The Internet May Be Humankind's Greatest Masterpiece

In her new book Magic and Loss, Virginia Heffernan makes the case for the Internet as art. Just look at Twitter, she says. "It's hard to think of a time when poetry was more powerful."
NPR

Exploring The 'Quiet New York' With Emma Straub

Straub's new book, Modern Lovers, is a tale of old friendships, secrets and family entanglements set in a part of Brooklyn writers often ignore: leafy, largely residential Ditmas Park.
NPR

Slavery Scars A Trans-Atlantic Family Tree In 'Homegoing'

Yaa Gyasi's debut novel follows the family lines of two separated half-sisters in 18th-century Ghana: One is married off to an Englishman, while the other is sent to America and sold into slavery.
NPR

'Everybody Behaves Badly': The Backstory To 'The Sun Also Rises'

The true story of Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises is told in Lesley Blume's book, Everybody Behaves Badly. She talks to NPR's Scott Simon about what made Hemingway's book such a breakthrough.
NPR

'But What If We're Wrong:' A Look At How We Will Remember The Now, Later

NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with author and cultural critic, Chuck Klosterman. His new book But What If We're Wrong investigates which things we take as certainties might one day be proven wrong.

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