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Obama's 'Body Man' Looks Back On His Presidential Education

Reggie Love went from playing sports at Duke to working as Barack Obama's personal assistant. His new memoir, Power Forward, describes what he learned on the campaign trail and in the White House.
NPR

We Went From Hunter-Gatherers To Space Explorers, But Are We Happier?

In his book Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari packs the history of humanity into 400 pages. "In some areas we've done amazingly well," the historian says. "In other areas we've done amazingly bad."
NPR

'Alphabetical' Tells The Story Behind Every Letter, A To Z

There are 26 letters in the English alphabet. But how did they get there, and why do they look the way they do? Michael Rosen looks for answers in his new book Alphabetical.
NPR

An Expansive View Of Vietnam In 'She Weeps Each Time You're Born'

Poet and author Quan Barry — born in Vietnam but raised in America — says she wants her new novel to help get rid of some of the preconceptions Americans have about Vietnam as a quagmire.
NPR

On Board A City Bus, A Little Boy Finds The Route To Gratitude

In Last Stop on Market Street, a little boy goes on a journey with his grandmother. Along the way he meets many interesting passengers and learns to recognize the blessings right in front of him.
NPR

In 'Red Notice,' Success Draws Treachery, Tragedy In Putin's Russia

Robert Siegel talks to Bill Browder, an American financier who was expelled from post-Soviet Russia and saw an attempt to claim his company devolve into a deadly bureaucratic and legal farce.
NPR

Novelist's 'Disgruntled' Heroine Is Drawn From Her Own Childhood

Asali Solomon's novel is about a girl growing up in West Philadelphia whose parents were black nationalists. "My parents taught us to revere Africa — people at school made fun of Africa," she says.
NPR

Drift Away Into The Not-Quite-Dreamy Logic Of 'Get In Trouble'

Kelly Link says the stories in her new collection Get in Trouble employ "night time logic." It's not quite dream logic, she tells NPR — nonsensical, but it has "a kind of emotional truth to it."
NPR

Fingertips To Hair Follicles: Why 'Touch' Triggers Pleasure And Pain

In his latest book, neuroscientist David Linden explains the science of touch. He tells Fresh Air how pain protects, why fingertips are so sensitive and why you can't read Braille with your genitals.
NPR

As America Grays, A Call For Dignity In Aging And Elder Care

In The Age of Dignity, Ai-jen Poo says rather than viewing aging from a place of scarcity and fear, we should see getting older as an opportunity. And, she writes, we must fix our flawed care system.

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