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NPR

When It Comes To Economic Recovery, Location Is A Factor

Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
NPR

Poet Finds Summer Is A Time To Reconnect With Nature

In this poem, "Kingfisher," Chris McCabe recalls a bird watching trip, and an attempt to see a rare bird — the vivid blue kingfisher — that he long dreamed of seeing.
WAMU 88.5

"Blue-Eyed Boy" - A Journalist's Memoir

Kojo talks with journalist Robert Timberg about his new memoir. In it, Timberg recounts injuries sustained in Vietnam his service and reveals how his reinvention as a journalist helped to heal the mental and physical wounds he suffered.

NPR

A Frustrated Professor Sounds Off To 'Committee Members'

The protagonist of Julie Schumacher's new Dear Committee Members is frustrated with the future of American arts and letters — and the feckless students who pester him for recommendation letters.
NPR

Cardiologist Speaks From The Heart About America's Medical System

In his new memoir, Doctored, Sandeep Jauhar describes a growing discontent among doctors and how it's affecting patients. He says rushed doctors are often practicing "defensive medicine."
WAMU 88.5

Slave Resistance and the American Revolution

Kojo and University of Houston historian Gerald Horne revisit the years leading up to the American Revolution to find out how slavery in North America and the British colonies influenced—and even motivated—the revolt.

NPR

Seeking Proof For Why We Feel Terrible After Too Many Drinks

Author Adam Rogers says there are lots of myths about what causes hangovers. His new book, Proof: The Science of Booze, explores these and other scientific mysteries of alcohol's effect on the body.
NPR

'Sweetness #9' Satirizes Food Wars And Artificial America

The novel is about a flavor chemist who tests a sweetener on lab rats and monkeys and finds side effects the company covers up. Author Stephan Eirik Clark says he was inspired by Fast Food Nation.
NPR

Thoughts Of Fall Butt Into Lazy Day Of Summer

For our look at summer poetry, we turn to Charlotte Boulay, a Philadelphia-based poet, with "The End of Summer." She offers a poem that, on its surface, is about an idyllic activity: taking a nap.
NPR

Medical Examiner: 'Staying Alive Is Mostly Common Sense'

Forget what CSI told you about the job: it's less about solving crimes and more about accidents. Judy Melinek hopes to paint a more accurate picture of the profession in her new book, Working Stiff.

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