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'Cartel' Author Spins A Grand Tale Of Mexico's Drug Wars

Novelist Don Winslow spent 10 years researching the Mexican drug wars. His new novel, The Cartel, reveals "a new generation of cartel leaders that are more violent, more sadistic" than ever before.
WAMU 88.5

"The Orphan Sky"

Singer, composer, and- most recently- author Ella Leya was born in Communist Azerbaijan and received asylum in the United States in 1990. Leila, the main character of her new novel "The Orphan Sky" shares a similar story. We talk with the first-time novelist about the rarely-explored setting of Azerbaijan and how music influenced her life and writing.

WAMU 88.5

Jonathan M. Bryant: "Dark Places Of The Earth: The Voyage Of The Slave Ship Antelope"

Historian Jonathan Bryant brings to light the history of the rarely-studied slave ship Antelope and the court battle over the fate of the nearly 300 captives it carried. Bryant joins Diane to talk about the 1825 case he calls "the most important Supreme Court case you've never heard of."

NPR

When Weed Is The Cure: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana

Dr. David Casarett used to think of medical marijuana as "a joke." But after taking a deeper look, he's changed his mind. Casarett's new book is Stoned: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana.
NPR

Ta-Nehisi Coates On Police Brutality, The Confederate Flag And Forgiveness

Growing up in Baltimore, the writer faced threats from both the streets and the police. His book, Between the World and Me, is an open letter to his teenage son.

NPR

After Fight For Life And Media Firestorm, 'Distressed Baby' Is Happy Toddler

When a CEO blamed "distressed babies" for cuts to benefits last year, Deanna Fei discovered her infant was national news. She reflects on how she coped with a baby on life support — and in headlines.
NPR

In Palestine, A Child Of Violence Becomes A Music Educator

Children of the Stone tells the story of a rock-throwing Palestinian teen's journey to found a music school. NPR's Lynn Neary speaks with Ramzi Aburedwan and author Sandy Tolan.
NPR

Fearing Her Mind's Decline, Patricia Marx Scrambles To Get 'Less Stupid'

The first woman to write for The Harvard Lampoon, now a New Yorker staffer, Marx still felt like she was getting forgetful with age. So, she put her head to work, doing every brain game she could.
NPR

Winning Is For Losers: The Great Stories Of The Guys Who Finish Last

Author Max Leonard says that, when it comes to the Tour de France, the riders in the back often have far more interesting stories than the riders in the front. His new book is called Lanterne Rouge.
NPR

In 'New World,' Former British Poet Laureate Returns To 'Treasure Island'

Andrew Motion's new book was inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson's classic Treasure Island. NPR's Wade Goodwyn speaks with Motion about his novel The New World.

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