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'Dinner': A Ritual Of Love

Host Rachel Martin talks with Jenny Rosenstrach about her book, Dinner: A Love Story, based on her popular blog of the same name. It's a cookbook and memoir that covers all the stages of a family's life as experienced through meals.
NPR

Look Up, Stargazers: June 5 Is The Transit Of Venus

The rare daytime astronomical event, in which Venus can be seen as a tiny black dot crossing the sun, won't happen again until 2117. Andrea Wulf, author of Chasing Venus, explains how 18th-century astronomers used the event to calculate the distance between the Earth and the sun.
NPR

One Man's Case For Regulating Hate Speech

In his new book, Jeremy Waldron writes that the U.S. is the only liberal democracy in the world that doesn't restrict hate speech — and that needs to change. He says, "I don't believe it's the role of law to protect people from being offended," but protecting human dignity is another matter.
NPR

'Life Behind The Lobby' Of Indian-American Motels

Chances are, if you've stayed in motels in the past decade, you've stayed in at least one owned by an Indian-American. It turns out more than half of all motels in the U.S. are Indian-American-owned. And even more remarkable, the vast majority of those owners are from one western state in India.
NPR

Why Do Humans Crave Crispy Food?

John S. Allen, a research scientist at the University of Southern California, explores our draw to crispy foods in a new book called The Omnivorous Mind: Our Evolving Relationship With Food. He speaks to host Guy Raz.
NPR

America's Gone Bananas: Here's How It Happened

The Fish That Ate the Whale tells the story of Sam Zemurray, a Jewish immigrant who came to the U.S. as a teenager and became one of the biggest players in the banana business. "He's like the American dream in the shape of a single life," says author Rich Cohen.
NPR

Why Ignorance Trumps Knowledge In Scientific Pursuit

In Ignorance: How It Drives Science, neuroscientist Stuart Firestein writes that science is often like looking for a black cat in a dark room, and there may not be a cat in the room. Firestein discusses why the hit-or-miss process, the "not knowing" is the true engine of science.
NPR

A Memoir About Mothers, Memory And Loss

Writer Mira Bartok's memoir, The Memory Palace, is in part about the car accident that left her with traumatic brain injury and about her relationship with her schizophrenic mother. She explains how her brain injury helped her understand — and reconnect with — her mother.

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