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Teddy Roosevelt's 'Doomed' War On New York Vice

When Teddy Roosevelt became a New York police commissioner in 1895, he vowed to clean up the city's endemic vice and corruption. It didn't exactly work out. New Yorkers liked the idea of standing up to corrupt cops, but they rebelled when Roosevelt tried to enforce a ban on Sunday drinking.
NPR

A Book Gets New Life After Movie's Buzz

Lionel Shriver's The New Republic is an earlier novel that was rejected by publishers. It's getting a warmer reception after a much-buzzed-about movie was made of her book, We Need To Talk About Kevin. Guest host Susan Stamberg speaks with the author.
NPR

Secrets And Lies Overseas In 'The Expats'

Author Chris Pavone's new thriller follows a former CIA assassin who tries to put her past behind her and make a new life with her husband in Luxembourg. Needless to say, things don't go as planned.
NPR

'The Big Con': If You Can't Avoid It, Avenge It

When con men took off with Texas rancher J. Frank Norfleet's fortune, he turned con man himself in the hopes of stealing his money back. In The Mark Inside, Amy Reading shares one of the strangest stories in the history of the swindle.
WAMU 88.5

Readers' Review: "Angela's Ashes" by Frank McCourt (Rebroadcast)

For our March Readers' Review, Diane and her guests will discuss a classic modern memoir. It's the story of an Irish childhood shaped not just by poverty but also a resilient spirit. We hope you will join us to discuss "Angela's Ashes" on Wednesday, March 21.

NPR

Writing The Messy Life Of A Sexual Health Pioneer

Margaret Sanger founded the organization that became Planned Parenthood. Her work around sexual health made her one of the most celebrated and vilified figures in women's history. Host Michel Martin explores Sanger's complex life and drive for her work with Jean Baker, author of the biography Margaret Sanger: A Life of Passion.

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